24 relationship comics that illustrate the beauty in the mundane moments.

Big, profound moments are important in relationships, but the small, seemingly inconsequential ones often are what build the foundation.

Philippa Rice began capturing the day-to-day parts of her relationship with her boyfriend, Luke Pearson, in a comic series she titled "Soppy." The U.K.-based artist and illustrator started drawing them because she wanted to document those small moments and "silly things," she told Upworthy. The series was eventually published in a book called "Soppy: A Love Story."

Rice didn't set out with any particular big purpose — her series was simply an ongoing project to "fondly remember the times at the beginning of mine and Luke's relationship."


But it turns out that those fond memories are quite relatable.

"Lots of people have told me that the comics are just like their own relationships," Rice told Upworthy in an email interview. "Some people have said I must be spying on them! It's actually really nice to think that we're all sort of the same in some ways!"

Indeed we are. From figuring out what to have for dinner to assembling IKEA furniture (the true test of any relationship), the everyday experiences in relationships can be pretty universal.

Enjoy these 24 comics. At least a few — and probably many — might remind you of the early days of relationships you've had.

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All comics are property of publisher Andrews McMeel, shared here with permission.

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Relatable, right?

"I think comics can do pretty much anything," Rice said. "They can be meaningful or they can be totally meaningless fun or anything in-between."

Rice feels that diary comics, like this Soppy series, are meaningful "because they come straight from one person's real life."

And Rice did an amazing job of capturing what real life is all about: the little parts that matter so much, even though we don't realize it as they occur.

Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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via Fox 5 / YouTube

Back in February, northern Virginia was experiencing freezing temperatures, so FOX 5 DC's Bob Barnard took to the streets to get the low down. His report opens with him having fun with some Leesburg locals and trying his hand at scraping ice off their parked cars.

But at about the 1:50 mark, he was interrupted by an unaccompanied puppy running down the street towards the news crew.

The dog had a collar but there was no owner in sight.

Barnard stopped everything he was doing to pick the dog up off the freezing road to keep it safe. "Forget the people we talked to earlier, I want to get to know this dog," he told his fellow reporters back in the warm newsroom.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less