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17 women who'd make an awesome James Bond.

Gillian Anderson and Emilia Clarke are into it.

17 women who'd make an awesome James Bond.

It's Bond. James Bond.

Beloved fictional British spy James Bond has been saving the world for more than half a century, and while there's been some change (he's been played by seven different actors over more than 20 films), at its core, the Bond character continues to resemble the spy originally crafted by novelist Ian Fleming.


Photo by Greg Williams/Eon Productions via Getty Images.

Recently, there's been a push to cast a woman in the role of 007, and at least two actresses are totally on board with the idea.

Gillian Anderson of "X-Files" fame and Emilia Clarke from "Game of Thrones" have both tossed their hats into the ring to replace Daniel Craig, the current Bond.

It started when Anderson answered a question on Tumblr: "What is the best rumor you've ever heard about yourself?" with "That I might be the next Bond." Since then, fans have been coming out of the woodwork to support the idea of Agent Scully stepping into the role.

Craig, who reprised the role for the fourth time in l "Spectre," is totally cool with the concept of having a woman play the role, saying, "I think it’s a great idea. If it works it works. That’s the great thing about film is it’s all about imagination so of course it could happen. Not that’s it a huge push, it’s just that anything’s possible."


Here's a look at 17 badass women in Hollywood who'd probably do a pretty awesome job as James — er, Jane Bond.

1. Gillian Anderson

"The X-Files," "Hannibal," and "The Fall" feature the versatile actress playing complex (and badass) characters. Without a doubt, she'd be an awesome Bond.

Photo by Ari Perilstein/Getty Images for The Weinstein Company.

2. Emilia Clarke

Not only does Clarke play Daenerys Targaryen on "Game of Thrones" (which, honestly, would have been enough reason to put her on the list), but she also flexed her action-star muscles a bit playing Sarah Connor in 2015's "Terminator Genisys."

Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

3. Zoe Saldana

She certainly held her own in "Avatar," "Star Trek," and "Guardians of the Galaxy." Who's to say she wouldn't make an awesome Bond?

Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images.

4. Lucy Liu

Currently starring as Dr. Joan Watson on "Elementary," Liu is the very model of how seamless a gender-swapped character can work into a storyline. Add in the fact that she's been in films like "Charlie's Angels" and "Kill Bill," and she'd totally do a great job as Bond.

Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images.

5. Angelina Jolie

Not only has she starred in action roles like "Mr. & Mrs. Smith," "Salt," and "Lara Croft: Tomb Raider," but she's also a UN Special Envoy of the High Commissioner for Refugees. Action chops and diplomatic experience? Perfect.

Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images.

6. Serena Williams

OK, so, Serena Williams isn't really known as an actress (though she did pick up a screen credit in Beyoncé's "Lemonade" video, so that should count as like half a dozen regular roles, right?), but admit it, you'd totally want to see a James Bond movie starring the tennis legend, right?

Photo by Bradley Kanaris/Getty Images.

7. Michelle Rodriguez

Star of the "Fast & Furious" franchise, Rodriguez has shown she can hold her own when it comes to anchoring an action sequence. She's been outspoken about her desire to see better roles for women in action movies for a while now. You can imagine what she'd be capable of with Bond's license to kill.

Photo by Samir Hussein/Getty Images for Avakian.

8. Robin Wright

Robin Wright probably isn't the first name to come to mind when you think of a future James Bond, but her role as Claire Underwood on "House of Cards" makes her a force to be reckoned with.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

9. Kerry Washington

James Bond is basically Olivia Pope — except for all the shooting and the ... OK, so, Bond and Pope don't have that much in common, but Kerry Washington can basically do anything, so I wouldn't count her out.

Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images for the DAILY FRONT ROW.

10. Ming-Na Wen

You probably know Ming-Na Wen from her role as Melinda May on Marvel's "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." And if you do, you know that she's part of some of the most badass fight scenes to ever appear on TV and has a killer high kick that you would not want to be on the receiving end of.

Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images.

11. Tatiana Maslany

Tatiana Maslany is the star of "Orphan Black," where she plays a half a dozen or so characters, each more complex than the last. If you're looking for someone who can bring something new and fresh to a storied franchise like James Bond, Maslany's a solid choice.

Photo by Gabriel Olsen/Getty Images for GLAAD.

12. Rosario Dawson

Yes, it's been more than a decade since Dawson was tearing things up in "Sin City," but that doesn't mean she's lost her edge. Popping up in Marvel properties like "Jessica Jones," "Daredevil," and the upcoming "Luke Cage" series, Dawson's still got it.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

13. Charlize Theron

It's Furiosa. Imperator Furiosa. Seriously, not only should Theron do as many action flicks as possible (please do another "Mad Max" — please), but she could 100% rock the role of James Bond, mixing sophistication with all-around badassery.

Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images.

14. Lynda Carter

She doesn't act all that much anymore, but Lynda Carter (aka Wonder Woman) could make a monster comeback by picking up the role of MI6's finest.

Photo by Rachel Murray/Getty Images for Alliance for Women in Media.

15. Beyoncé

Let's forget that Queen Bey was in that 2002 Austin Powers movie. Let's just forget that. OK? That was forever ago, before she harnessed the superpower that is being Beyoncé. You saw her kicking ass in the "Lemonade" video. She's a natural for this role.

Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images.

16. Jessica Alba

With action and adventure credits that include "Dark Angel," "Sin City," and "Fantastic Four," Jessica Alba has a resume that'd make just about any casting director drool. Now imagine her as James Bond.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

17. Lucy Lawless

If for no other reason than the fact that she played "Xena: Warrior Princess," Lucy Lawless would be warmly welcomed back into action roles. Lawless. Lucy Lawless.

Photo by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for SiriusXM.

Will the next Bond be a woman from this list? Probably not. Even so, it's fun to think about.

And beyond that, it's great that this is even an idea that's being entertained outside the realm of fan fiction. Are there more pressing gender-related issues to worry about in Hollywood? Sure. Wage inequality and representation both in front of and behind the cameras could use some major work. Does that make dreaming up a gender-swapped James Bond any less entertaining? Nah.

May the next James Bond — whoever they may be — lead the franchise in exciting new directions.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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When we think of what a Tyrannosaurus looked like, we picture a gargantuan dinosaur with a huge mouth, formidable legs and tail, and inexplicably tiny arms. When we picture how it behaved, we might imagine it stomping and roaring onto a peaceful scene, single-handedly wreaking havoc and tearing the limbs off of anything it can find with its steak-knife-like teeth like a giant killing machine.

The image is probably fairly accurate, except for one thing—there's a good chance the T. rex wouldn't have been hunting alone.

New research from a fossil-filled quarry in Utah shows that Tyrannosaurs may have been social creatures who utilized complex group hunting strategies, much like wolves do. The research team who conducted the fossil study and made the discovery include scientists from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Colby College of Maine, and James Cook University in Australia.

The idea of social Tyrannosaurs isn't entirely new—Canadian paleontologist Philip Curie floated the hypothesis 20 years ago upon the discovery of a group of T. rex skeletons who appeared to have died together—but it has been widely debated in the paleontology world. Many scientists have doubted that their relatively small brains would be capable of such complex social behavior, and the idea was ridiculed by some as sensationalized paleontology PR.

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2020 was difficult (to say the least). The year was full of life changes, losses, and lessons as we learned to navigate the "new normal." You may have questions about what the changes and challenges of 2020 mean for your taxes. That's where TurboTax Live comes in, making it easy to connect with real tax experts to help with your taxes – or even do them for you, start to finish.

Not only has TurboTax Live helped millions of people get their taxes done right, but this year they've also celebrated people who uplifted their communities during a difficult time by surprising them with "little lifts" to help out even more.

Here are a few of their stories:


Julz, hairdresser and salon owner

"As a hairdresser and salon owner, 2020 was extremely challenging," says Julz. "Being a hairdresser has historically been a recession-proof industry, but we've never faced global shut down due to health risk, or pandemic, not in my lifetime. And for the first time, hairdressers didn't have job security."

Julz had to shut down her salon and go on unemployment benefits for the first time. She also had to figure out how she was going to support herself, her staff and her business during this difficult time. But many other beauty industry professionals didn't have access to the resources they needed, so Julz decided to help.

"My business partner and I began teaching basic financial literacy to other beauty industry professionals," she says. "Transitioning our business from behind the chair to an online academy was a challenge we tackled head-on so that we could move hairdressers into this new space of education, and create a more accessible curriculum to better serve our industry.

Julz connected with a TurboTax Live expert who helped her understand how unemployment affected her taxes and gave her guidance on filing quarterly estimated taxes for her small business. "I was terrified to sit at a computer and tackle this mess of receipts," Julz says, so "it was great to have some virtual handholding to walk me through each question."

In addition to giving Julz the personalized tax advice she needed, TurboTax Live surprised her with a "little lift" that empowered her to help even more beauty professionals. "When my tax expert Diana surprised me with a little lift, I was moved to tears," says Julz. "With that little lift, I was able to establish a scholarship fund to help get other hairdressers the education they deserve."


Alana, new mom

Alana welcomed her first child in 2020. "I think my biggest challenge was figuring out how to be a mom, with no guidance," she says. "My original plan was to have my mom by my side, teaching me the ropes, but because of COVID, she wasn't able to come out here."

She was also without a job for most of 2020 and struggled to find something new.

So, Alana took it as a sign: she decided to launch her own business so she could support her new baby, and that's exactly what she did. She started a feel-good company that specializes in creating affirmation card decks — and she's currently in the process of starting a second, video-editing business.

TurboTax Live answered Alana's questions about her taxes and gave her some much-needed advice as she prepared to launch her businesses. Thanks to their "little lift," they provided her with a little emotional support too.

"I got my mom a plane ticket to finally [have her] meet [my daughter] for her first birthday," Alana says. "I was also able to get a new computer," which helped her invest in her new business and work on her video editing skills. "It's helped my family and me so much," she says.


Michael, science teacher

When schools shut down across the country last year, Michael had to learn how to adapt to a virtual classroom.

"As a teacher, I had to completely revamp everything," he says, so that he could keep his students engaged while teaching online. "At the beginning, it was a nightmare because I had no idea. I had to go from A-Z within a couple of weeks."

Michael's TurboTax Live expert answered his questions about how working from home affected his taxes and helped him uncover surprising tax deductions. To top it all off, his expert surprised him with brand new science equipment and supplies, which allowed him to create an entire line of classes on YouTube, TikTok, Instagram, and Facebook. "Now I can truly potentially reach millions of children with my lessons," he says. "I would never have taken that leap if not for the little lift from TurboTax Live."



Ricky, motivational youth speaker

As a motivational speaker, Ricky was used to doing his job in person, but, he says, "when COVID-19 hit, it altered my ability to travel and visit schools in person [because] schools moved to fully virtual or hybrid models."

He knew he had to pivot — so he began offering small virtual group workshops for student leadership groups at middle and high schools.

"This allowed me to work with student leaders to plan how they would continue making a positive impact on their school community," he says. He wasn't sure how being remote would affect his taxes, but TurboTax Live Self-Employed gave him the advice and answers that he needed to keep more money in his pocket at tax time — and the little lift he received from them has helped him serve even more students.

"[It] has been a major blessing," he says "There will be multiple schools and student groups from across the country that I can hold leadership workshops with to empower them with the tools to be inspirational leaders in their school, community, and world."

Plus, he says, it was great knowing he had an expert to help him figure out how being remote affected his taxes. "I felt confident and assured in the process of filing my taxes knowing I had an expert working with me, says Ricky. "There were things my expert knew that I would not have considered when filing on my own."

Filing your taxes doesn't have to be intimidating, especially after a year like 2020. TurboTax Live experts can give you the "little lift" you need to get your taxes done. File with the help of an expert or let an expert file for you! Go to TurboTax Live to get started.