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14 striking photos of dancers in Mexico to remind you of its beauty.

"Latin American people have played an important part in what America is today."

Photographer Omar Z. Robles wants to remind us of Mexico's powerful beauty and cultural significance.

Like many other Americans, Robles had a difficult time stomaching the anti-Mexican, anti-immigrant rhetoric of Donald Trump throughout his presidential campaign. After hearing Mexicans labeled drug dealers, killers, and rapists, Robles decided to do something bold in opposition. In late October, he headed to Mexico City to capture some of its beauty on camera.

"Latin American people have played an important part in what America is today," says Robles. "I wanted to go to the source — Mexico City — and show Mexico in a different light that maybe people in America don’t usually see."


Robles used dancers from dance companies in Mexico City, most of whom had lived and worked there for over 15 years, to help elevate their surroundings. The shoot took place over 13 days from the end of October to the beginning of November, when Day of the Dead celebrations take place in the city.

Here are 14 stunning moments Robles captured:

1. Greta Elizondo in Cuernavaca, Morelos.

2. Greta Elizondo in Cuernavaca, Morelos.

3. Iratxe Beorlegui at the Monument to the Revolution, Mexico City.

4. Scarlet Güemez in Puerto Nuevo Nativitas, Xochimilco.

5. Ximena González in Coyoacán, Mexico City.

6. Mayuko Nihei in Zócalo, Mexico City.

7. Iratxe Beorlegui, Zócalo, Mexico City.

8. Edith Luna and Maria Fernanda Cervantes, in Zócalo, Mexico City.

9. Scarlet Güemez, Puerto Nuevo Nativitas, Xochimilco.

10. Monica Arroyo in Polanco, Mexico City.

11. Andrea Salazar in Cuernavaca, Morelos.

12. Mayuko Nihei in Plaza de la Constitución, Mexico City.

13. Julio Morel in Coyoacán, Mexico City.

14. Maria Fernanda Cervantes in Zócalo, Mexico City.

At a time when our president-elect wants to build a wall between the United States and Mexico, Robles is hoping his photographs open as many windows as possible — to remind the world why Mexico can't be shut out or forgotten.

"As artists, the best thing we can do at moments like this is just keep doing what we do," Robles says. "It serves as a way of projecting what we see that is wrong."

Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

Noe Hernandez and Maria Carrillo, the owners of Noel Barber Shop in Anaheim, California.

Jordyn Poulter was the youngest member of the U.S. women’s volleyball team, which took home the gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics last year. She was named the best setter at the Tokyo games and has been a member of the team since 2018.

Unfortunately, according to a report from ABC 7 News, her gold medal was stolen from her car in a parking garage in Anaheim, California, on May 25.

It was taken along with her passport, which she kept in her glove compartment. While storing a gold medal in your car probably isn’t the best idea, she did it to keep it by her side while fulfilling the hectic schedule of an Olympian.

"We live this crazy life of living so many different places. So many of us play overseas, then go home, then come out here and train,” Poulter said, according to ABC 7. "So I keep the medal on me (to show) friends and family I haven't seen in a while, or just people in the community who want to see the medal. Everyone feels connected to it when they meet an Olympian, and it's such a cool thing to share with people."

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Memories of childhood get lodged in the brain, emerging when you least expect.

There are certain pleasurable sights, smells, sounds and tastes that fade into the rear-view mirror as we grow from being children to adults. But on a rare occasion, we’ll come across them again and it's like a portion of our brain that’s been hidden for years expresses itself, creating a huge jolt of joy.

It’s wonderful to experience this type of nostalgia but it often leaves a bittersweet feeling because we know there are countless more sensations that may never come into our consciousness again.

Nostalgia is fleeting and that's a good thing because it’s best not to live in the past. But it does remind us that the wonderful feeling of freedom, creativity and fun from our childhood can still be experienced as we age.

A Reddit user by the name of agentMICHAELscarnTLM posed a question to the online forum that dredged up countless memories and experiences that many had long forgotten. He asked a simple question, “What’s something you can bring up right now to unlock some childhood nostalgia for the rest of us?”

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