14 celeb tweets in support of Leslie Jones after the racist backlash to 'Ghostbusters.'

On July 18, 2016, "Ghostbusters" star Leslie Jones had finally had it.

Photo by Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images.


Jones is a fabulous, famous black woman on the internet. So as you can imagine, she's used to a fair share of gross internet comments.

But the online abuse directed at her seemed to really hit a fever pitch this week with the premiere of "Ghostbusters," and it didn't help that Twitter didn't seem to do all that much to stop the influx of harassment.

Instead of ignoring her haters, though, Jones starting sharing some of the awful messages being sent her way on Twitter.

The disgusting remarks — which you can read here (I'm going to keep the energy in this article positive, thank you very much) — was a harsh reminder that yes, sexism and racism are still alive and well.

Jones, being a human being and all, was understandably upset about the hateful sentiments thrown her way.

But while the Internet can be an abysmal place at times, it's worth remembering that kindness has a tendency to save the day.

In response to all the negativity, the hashtag #LoveForLeslieJ started trending on Facebook and Twitter, with thousands of fans expressing their support for the comedian and her badass movie.

Several celebrities chimed in using the #LoveForLeslieJ hashtag to show their support.

Like "Ghostbusters" Director Paul Feig.


Sophia Bush didn't let her love for Leslie go unnoticed.


Anna Kendrick chose to focus on how amazing "Ghostbusters" actually is.


Margaret Cho is confident Jones has a very bright future ahead of her.


Angela Bassett said a lot in just a few characters.


James Corden reminded Jones the love definitely outweighs the hate.


John Boyega sent some serious #MondayMotivation vibes Jones' way.


Brie Larson made it clear she is not here for the haters.


Jada Pinkett Smith encouraged Jones to keep being fabulous.

Elizabeth Banks used four simple words (and an emoji) to express her support.


Kristen Davis committed to standing in solidarity.


Chelsea Peretti went on a caps-lock spree to defeat evil.


Candice Patton encouraged Jones to continue radiating awesomeness.


And Tia Mowry sent out a memo we all could probably use right now: Love wins.


If it wasn't already abundantly clear, the world loves and appreciates you, Leslie Jones.

And no cowardly, mean-spirited tweet can change that.

Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

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