You can go to jail in this Virginia town for trick-or-treating at the wrong age.

Photo by Martin Bernetti/Getty Images

It ain't easy being 13 in Virginia. Halloween is so scary in 9 of the state's towns and cities that you could get arrested just for trick-or-treating.

What’s the right age to make that transition away from trick-or-treating each Halloween? For most people, there’s no clear answer.

Some of us continue to dress up and attend Halloween parties our entire lives and that’s perfectly OK. LeBron James, one of the most successful people on the planet, practically demands that his teammates and friends take part in his extravegant Halloween costume parties each year.


But one town in Virginia is making headlines for a city ordinance that literally makes it illegal for anyone over the age of 12 to go trick or treating.

And violating the law could earn you a fine up to $100 or … literally SIX MONTHS IN JAIL. You know, halfway toward the next Halloween. Gulp.

A copy of the Cheasapeake, Virginia city ordinance (established in 1970) recently went viral on Facebook and reads like this:

“If any person over the age of 12 years shall engage in the activity commonly known as ‘trick or treat’ or any other activity of similar character or nature under any name whatsoever, he or she shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of not less than $25.00 nor more than $100.00 or by confinement in jail for not more than six months or both.”

And the “fun” doesn’t end there.

Photo by Eric Miller/Getty Images.

There’s also a Halloween curfew of 8pm, again threatening jail time (this time “only” up to 30 days) for anyone who fails to comply.

Though before we place all the blame on little ole’ Cheasapeake, it turns out there are 9 cities in Virginia alone with their own bizarre Halloween laws, which you can read here.

But all 9 cities have the same stunning law in common of banning trick or treating by anyone over the age of 12.

We have a feeling some long-forgotten state politician was once seriously traumatized by a 13-year-old bully who showed up to their house dressed as Justin Bieber and demanding a Family Size Snickers, or else.

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