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Women share the reality of wearing a hijab. Their wisdom has lessons for us all.

In a short yet powerful video, these 6 ladies get vulnerable as they share their truths about life as a hijabi today.

Women share the reality of wearing a hijab. Their wisdom has lessons for us all.

These days there's plenty of commentary about the religion of Islam and/or Muslims on the news.

What about hearing straight from the source?


BuzzFeed Australia just made a great video featuring six women sharing what it's really like to be a hijabi today.

Hijabi women are Muslim women who wear a scarf called, well, a hijab to cover their hair, ears, and neck. They also observe a conservative style of dress that entails covering their entire body save for their hands and face. These women offer a unique point of view since the hijab makes it clear to the world what their religious identity is.

The video starts with a simple prompt — "I'm a hijabi woman, but..." — that reveals itself as a powerful springboard for dropping some serious truths about Islamophobia.

The video is only two and a half minutes long, but it is jam-packed with some great nuggets of humor, vulnerability, and wisdom that could benefit people of all beliefs (or lack thereof). Like:

Make sure you double- and triple-check before you think you've spotted Malala Yousafzai.


No, she won't be signing any autographs. All GIFs via BuzzFeedYellow/YouTube.

Don't judge a book by its cover (or, in this case, a woman by her hijab).

... so no making assumptions about personality.

These women get that the hijab may be the first thing you notice about them, but they are sooo much more than that.

And are willing to talk about nearly anything else.

Turns out hijabi women as just as diverse and complex as any other group of people. Shocker, right?

Islamophobia sucks. It has a huge impact on small parts of their day-to-day lives.

And probably most heartbreaking:

It's super unfair of people to keep demanding these women publicly condemn Muslim terrorists.

I mean, did anyone call for white male Christians to take a public stand in the aftermath of the 1996 Centennial Olympic bombings or this year's Planned Parenthood Colorado shooting?


But this woman will keep doing it anyway.

It's awful that the narrative around Islam and Muslims has been dominated by people who aren't Muslims themselves. The sad truth is that most Americans don't really know anything about the religion or its people.

That's why this video is so refreshing.

In it, we finally see Muslims share what it's like to be them, and we get a real look at the female Muslim experience in these tenuous times.

Want to learn more? Find a hijabi woman to ask (respectfully, of course). She might just be up for some more sharing.

Just try to make sure you do some basic research first. People can be a great resource, but they're not your private search engine.

In fact, watching the full video below could be a great start...

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True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

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