While visiting Trump's White House, this NFL player posted a powerful letter to Obama.

Every year, the winning NFL Super Bowl team gets to visit the White House and meet the president. It's supposed to be a great honor.

The champion New England Patriots got their tour on April 19, 2017 — only this year, there were some notable absences from some of the team's big-name players.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.


Some wouldn't say why they chose to pass on the invite — to be fair, many longtime Patriots players have visited the White House before — while others were ... less subtle in their reasoning.

Speaking to CNN, Patriots player Alan Branch said he skipped the trip because of the "disgusting" way that Donald Trump talks about women. "I have no interest in going and shaking his hand," Branch explained. "I've gotta [be able to] go back home and look my daughters in the eye."

Jacoby Brissett, a young third-string quarterback, had his own reason for accepting the White House invite.

Brissett was humbled by the opportunity to visit Washington and sat down before the visit to write a letter to the president.

Just not this president.

While at the White House, Brissett paused for a pic near a photo of former President Barack Obama that he posted to Instagram along with a moving open letter.

"I want to thank you for what you have done for this country — outside of politics," Brissett begins his letter.

"Honestly, I don't know enough about politics to judge what was good or bad, but I want you to know that when you said 'Yes We Can' — a young man dreaming a dream from rough circumstances in Florida heard you."

Dear Big O, I am writing you this letter to say thank you. I want to thank you for what you have done for this country – outside of politics. Honestly, I don't know enough about politics to judge what was good or bad, but I want you to know that when you said "Yes We Can" – a young man dreaming a dream from rough circumstances in Florida heard you. When you were elected President for the first time I was 16 and I watched you make the never-imaginable, attainable and I heard your cry to inspire hope. I used those words as motivation and saw your achievement as an opportunity and permission to work make my dreams come true too. You were the President of the United States – the highest office in the world. You broke a barrier and a stereotype proving not every minority has to use a ball to make a way. You've inspired a lifetime of dreamers young and old. Now, kids from my community – and my future children – will know that there is no dream too big – even they could be the President of the United States. As I prepare for the honor of visiting the White House, I will be there as a Super Bowl Champion – and I will think of you, mainly because the White House is a different, and better place because you lived there. I was a kid that came from nothing and I am living out one of the greatest dreams of my life. I am just grateful for the opportunity to walk on the same steps as you did, and to have a platform to inspire and I hope to leave my mark on history the way you did. One day, when I meet you, I will shake your hand and say thank you to your face but until then this kid is going to continue to dream until I can’t anymore. Thank you for blazing a trail, but for more than that, for leaving a paved road behind you for others to climb on. The biggest adventure you can take is to live the life of your DREAMS - Oprah Yes we can!! DREAM BIG!! Thank you, Jacoby Brissett P.S Holla at me to help you with your broke jump shot

A post shared by Jacoby Brissett (@jbrissett7) on

You can read the full text of Brissett's letter below:

"Dear Big O, I am writing you this letter to say thank you.

I want to thank you for what you have done for this country – outside of politics. Honestly, I don't know enough about politics to judge what was good or bad, but I want you to know that when you said "Yes We Can" — a young man dreaming a dream from rough circumstances in Florida heard you.

When you were elected President for the first time I was 16 and I watched you make the never-imaginable, attainable and I heard your cry to inspire hope. I used those words as motivation and saw your achievement as an opportunity and permission to work make my dreams come true too. You were the President of the United States — the highest office in the world. You broke a barrier and a stereotype proving not every minority has to use a ball to make a way. You've inspired a lifetime of dreamers young and old. Now, kids from my community — and my future children — will know that there is no dream too big — even they could be the President of the United States.

As I prepare for the honor of visiting the White House, I will be there as a Super Bowl Champion – and I will think of you, mainly because the White House is a different, and better place because you lived there. I was a kid that came from nothing and I am living out one of the greatest dreams of my life. I am just grateful for the opportunity to walk on the same steps as you did, and to have a platform to inspire and I hope to leave my mark on history the way you did.

One day, when I meet you, I will shake your hand and say thank you to your face but until then this kid is going to continue to dream until I can’t anymore. Thank you for blazing a trail, but for more than that, for leaving a paved road behind you for others to climb on. The biggest adventure you can take is to live the life of your DREAMS — Oprah Yes we can!! DREAM BIG!! Thank you, Jacoby Brissett P.S Holla at me to help you with your broke jump shot"







The letter went viral on social media because it's a message we all desperately need to hear.

There's no "throwing shade" at the sitting president. No doom and gloom. Just pure appreciation for how far we've come and for the hard work and relentless spirit of a man who has inspired so many.

It's a testament to the power of representation, to the impact of seeing yourself reflected in your leaders and what that can motivate new generations to accomplish.

"As I prepare for the honor of visiting the White House," Brisset's letter concludes, "I will be there as a Super Bowl Champion — and I will think of you, mainly because the White House is a different and better place because you lived there."

Sometimes it feels like we're going backward as a country, and it can be easy to forget the strides we made when we elected our first black president. But Jacoby Brissett hasn't forgotten, and neither have millions of other young people like him.

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