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While the rest of the world wasn't looking, Mongolia managed to achieve something kind of amazing.

The Overseas Development Institute has released a new report on Mongolia that's pretty incredible.

Even though up to 40% of Mongolia's population is nomadic, the country has found a way to achieve something wealthier nations can only envy: 98% of its girls and 93% of its boys are now getting a secondary education.


Mongolians value the education of their kids above almost everything else, and now their government — flush with money from a mining boom and improved taxation — has taken up the challenge of paying for it. With a completely overhauled modern education policy that's more responsive to families' needs, and with the support of external financing partners, they're actually getting it done.

"Big Brother Walks by His Sister and Mom"

Since his family is nomadic, 14-year-old Munkhin Otgonbayar has gone to schools in Uvs Province, Ulaangom, and Mongolia's capital, Ulaanbaatar.

"A Traditional Yurt, Now With Solar Panels and a Satellite Dish"

Mongolia has worked hard to preserve its cherished traditions in the face of modernization.

"Boys and Their Horses"

For school, Munkhdemberel Munkhbat leaves home and lives in a dormitory. Here he is hanging out with his friends at home — he's the one on the left.

"Doing Homework at Home"

Munkhdemberel hits the books in the family yurt.

"Two Boys Race Their Horses"

It's a traditional Mongolian pastime. These two boys are prepping to race in the Naadam festival of the Three Manly Sports: horse racing, wrestling, and archery.

"A 37-Year-Old Mongolian Mother"

Years ago, Togtokh Buyanjargal had to leave school in first grade to become a herder. She looks to a better future for her kids thanks to education.

"A Little Girl Watches the Big Kids Do Homework"

A girl watches her siblings work on their assignments. She looks a little envious.

"Urangoo Bayartsogt, Proudly at Her School Desk"

15-year-old schoolgirl Urangoo Bayartsogt attends a boarding school. Even though she's a long way from her parents and home, she obviously enjoys being there.

"Urangoo at the School Computers"

“The good thing about [boarding] school is that ... you can ask teachers to explain anything that you don't understand at any time."

"Dorm Life"

Urangoo has lived in a school dormitory since first grade. Her younger brothers, 8 and 9, live there with her.

"Teacher Gantuya Galkhuu"

The 29-year-old math teacher has been teaching at her boarding school for eight years. Mongolia encourages teachers to take jobs in remote areas, offering bonuses as incentives.

"Herder Battulga Dorjpurev"

35-year-old herder Battulga Dorjpurev has two kids at school in Bayankhangai Soum. When he was young, his parents weren't able to provide him an education.

"A Schoolboy and His Parents Shear Sheep During a School Holiday"

When school's in session, Dorjpurev's wife (left) moves to town with the kids so they can attend. “I guess everybody strives to provide their children with education," says Battulga.

Throughout his basketball career Michael Jordan has been criticized for not letting his voice be heard when it came to political change. That does not appear to be the case anymore. In the month of June alone, Michael Jordan and the Jordan Brand have donated $100 million dollars to organizations committed to race equality. A portion of the funds will be allocated to organizations helping to protect black voting rights.

In the latest announcement, Jordan himself and his Jordan Brand are investing $2.5 in organizations to help combat Black voter suppression. In a statement from the Jordan Brand, it was announced: $1 million dollars is being donated to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund Inc. and $1 million to the Formerly Incarcerated and Convicted People and Families Movement. The Black Voters Matter organization will receive $500,000 in the statement which was first reported by CNN.


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The United Nations is marking its 75th anniversary at a time of great challenge, including the worst global health crisis in its history. Will it bring the world closer together? Or will it lead to greater divides and mistrust?

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Arnold Schwarzenegger is a badass in the movies, but he's increasingly building a reputation as a heroic "action star" in real life. Only, instead of dropping ungodly amounts of fake bullets into his enemies, Schwarzenegger has been dropping rhetorical bombs against his political opponents while building intellectual and emotional bridges to those who disagree with him but still have open hearts and minds.

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Those of us who grew up in the Alanis Morissette angst era and followed her through her transformation into a more enlightened version of herself may be thrilled to know she has a new album out. Such Pretty Forks in the Road is her first album in eight years—and the first since two of her three children were born.

Anyone who's been working from home with kids knows that we're all in the same frequently interrupted boat. Such is the pandemic life. But we've also seen how those very human moments when kids insert themselves into life are some of the most real and precious. And that reality comes shining through in Morissette's Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon performance of her new song, "Ablaze," which is, not so ironically, a song about her children. As she sings, it's clear that she's still got the chops that made her famous. It's also clear that her 4-year-old daughter, Onyx, just sees her mommy as mommy and not as the iconic pop star that she is. The performance is lovely and sweet, and hearing Onyx's little voice and seeing her put her hand over her mom's mouth as she sings is just too adorably real.

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