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Where did Donald Trump get the idea that abortions happen on the due date?

His comments on abortion were a teensy bit inaccurate.

Where did Donald Trump get the idea that abortions happen on the due date?

In the third and final presidential debate, the candidates were finally asked about abortion.

With a seat on the Supreme Court waiting to be filled, the winner of the election will play a pretty huge role in determining the future of safe and legal abortion in the U.S. For months, abortion rights groups have been urging moderators to broach the subject. On Wednesday night, they got their wish.

The candidates' basic positions are known: Hillary Clinton is in favor of reinforcing the legal protections afforded by the Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade decision while Donald Trump has vowed to appoint justices he believes will overturn that decision.


Harder to discern was whatever Trump was trying to say about late-term abortions.

Wait, what? GIF from CNN/YouTube.

What Trump described wasn't an abortion at all. He described giving birth.

It should go without saying that no, you cannot get an abortion "in the ninth month on the final day." Even if that were possible, it's not legal, thanks to the 2003 Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act.

People on social media were quick to jump on Trump's claim about ripping babies from wombs.

While it's one thing to poke fun at Trump's statement, it's frightening to think that he's not alone in his misconceptions and spread of misinformation.

During a February Republican primary debate, Sen. Marco Rubio said, "Why doesn’t the media ask Hillary Clinton why she believes that all abortions should be legal, even on the due date of that unborn child?" (She doesn't.)

Meanwhile, Carly Fiorina went with this graphic lie:

In a September 2015 debate, GOP candidate Carly Fiorina described a video that purported to show an abortion. No video that matches her description exists. GIF via CNN/YouTube.

Last month, Sen. Ted Cruz claimed that Hillary Clinton "supports unlimited abortion on demand up until the moment of birth, including partial-birth abortion, with taxpayer funding." (She doesn't.)

The truth is that just 1.2% of abortions occur after 20 weeks of pregnancy, many of which are wanted pregnancies that either involve a threat to the life of the mother or would be fatal for the fetus.

There's a lot of stigma surrounding abortion, and misrepresenting what abortion actually is doesn't help anyone.

Whatever your position on abortion — whether you're of the mindset that it should be legal in all instances, in some instances, or not at all — can we at least agree that these arguments are best made when they are based in fact? There is no such thing as a nine-month abortion, nor are there videos showing brains being harvested.

Misrepresenting those who do need a late-term abortion (for whatever reason) doesn't help advance political discourse either. And conflating birth by cesarean section with a partial-birth abortion makes you look a tiny bit on the foolish side.

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Middle school has to be the most insecure time in a person's life. Kids in their early teens are incredibly cruel and will make fun of each other for not having the right shoes, listening to the right music, or having the right hairstyle.

As if the social pressure wasn't enough, a child that age has to deal with the intensely awkward psychological and biological changes of puberty at the same time.

Jason Smith, the principal of Stonybrook Intermediate and Middle School in Warren Township, Indiana, had an insecure child sent to his office recently, and his ability to understand his feelings made all the difference.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

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This story was originally published on The Mighty.

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via Chairman of the joint Chiefs of Staff / Flickr and Valley of the Dogs / Instagram

Ryan Fischer, 30, was shot last night in West Hollywood, California while walking three of Oscar- and Grammy-winner Lady Gaga's dogs. He was taken to the hospital in critical condition and according to The New York Post is, "thankfully recovering well."

After the shooting, the suspects stole two of Gaga's French Bulldogs Gustavo and Koji. A third bulldog belonging to the singer, Miss Asia, ran away from the scene and was later recovered by law enforcement.

Steve, a friend of the victim, told FOX 11 that Fisher was passionate about the dogs.

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