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Being biracial can often feel like being caught between two worlds.

Biracial folks are often tethered to two (or more) sets of ideas of how someone of their heritage should be, look like, and act. And as a result, they can find themselves feeling unrepresented, lacking a strong claim to any racial background.


That feeling of anxiety is what prompted Jaya Saxena to start #BiracialLooksLike, a hashtag that highlights the faces and experiences of mixed race people.

“Among many biracial/multiracial people I know, there is anxiety over whether we look enough like what we 'are,'" Jaya tweeted. “I want to show, and for everyone to know, that there is no one way for biracial to look."

biracial-jaya-saxena.jpg-large

Jaya posted this photo of herself and ignited a #BiracialLooksLike movement. Photo provided by Jaya, used with permission.

#BiracialLooksLike took off from there, with users tweeting photos of themselves and their multiracial families as well as the experiences unique to people with mosaic ethnic backgrounds.

I'm biracial, too. My dad is Filipino, and he came to America when he was a kid. My mom was born and raised in Texas.

When I saw the hashtag, I tweeted a picture of myself with my mom and dad:

It's not the most flattering photo of any of us (and it's missing my brothers and sister, who are white), but it's a genuine reflection of my family: ridiculous, unprepared, and biracial.

When I was a kid, people would sometimes speculate that I was adopted when they saw me with my mom and my siblings.

It's not uncommon for people to assume that my mom is "not my real mom," even though we look alike.

Many Twitter users posting on the #BiracialLooksLike tag shared similar experiences.

Despite the growing rates of interracial marriages and multiracial kids, many people jump to conclusions when they see families like ours.

Some people even used the hashtag to point out the unique experiences that many multiracial people share, like the inevitable inquiries of “What are you?" and “Is that your real mom?"

At its core, the hashtag is an opportunity for multiracial folks to make our faces, our families, and our struggles visible.

Take a few minutes to scroll through the tweets today; you may be surprised what biracial really looks like.

via Pexels

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