When you introduce art to kids the world over, it looks a little something like this.

Remember when you were a kid and you got to create art just because it was fun?

Meet Ivanke, an illustrator and art teacher, and Sofia, photographer and filmmaker. They are founders of Little Big Worlds and have traveled to over 26 countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Why?


All images via Pequenios Grandes Mundos.

To introduce art to kids, especially those who don't usually have access to such things because they're in rural schools, refugee camps, foster homes, hospitals, and more. They want to create art with kids who don't usually get to create it, and maybe never have.

It's the kind of thing that spans countries, crosses political lines, and connects people in ways that human beings really need.

Especially kids.

Does it work? Seeing the joy in the faces of these children should answer that question.

Little Big Worlds not only introduces kids to art, it also gives them a glimpse of the rest of the world; the videos they get to see of other countries and cultures participating in the same activities that they are helps them understand more about how much people are alike the world over.

The artists at Little Big Worlds have done this so far from their own pockets. They want to expand to creating art with refugee children in Europe. You can help them do that on their GoFundMe page.

Check out the video below.

(And since the making of this, they've gone on to Asia. That video lives here — and it's also pretty fabulous. Next stop? Africa.)

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