When his wife was diagnosed with breast cancer, Bob put on a tutu and went straight for the laughs.

"Excuse me sir, are you wearing anything under your tutu?" the police officer asked.

The man responded, "Yes, officer, I am wearing my pink shorts that match my pink tutu."


You never know what you'll see in NYC, or anywhere, with the tutu man. All photos via Bob Carey, used with permission.

The man rocking the pink tutu is named Bob Carey, and for over 10 years, he's been running around in it for a very special person: his wife, Linda.

When Linda was diagnosed with breast cancer, Bob, a photographer, did two of the things he knew how to do best: He got out his camera and his silly humor.

As a coping mechanism and to show support to his wife during her battle, he started taking photos of himself in a light pink tutu in the most random places — no matter the temperature or location.

You can't help but smile at his effort.

And that's the entire point. It's no wonder The Tutu Project has become such a hit.

"When Linda would go for treatment, she would take the images on her phone, and the women would look at them, and it would make them laugh and make the time pass," Bob says about the project.

Bob's been dancing around all over the place:

On the Coney Island boardwalk.


In an Arizona parking lot.


Standing on water.

Hanging on for dear life.

Making new friends in Germany.

Making new friends who speak in "moo."

Wandering around a football stadium.

Stranded in the desert.

The photos have been shared and admired all over the world. And it's not just about the laughs they create — it's about how they serve as a way to reach out to one another and show support.

"Oddly enough, her cancer has taught us that life is good, dealing with it can be hard, and sometimes the very best thing — no, the only thing — we can do to face another day is to laugh at ourselves and share a laugh with others," Bob says

But Bob isn't the only one in a tutu anymore. More laughs are being shared than ever before with the launch of the #Dare2Tutu campaign.

Here's how it works: People from all over the world are daring each other to wear a tutu and take a picture of it, tagging it with #Dare2Tutu. They're also encouraging donations to their nonprofit, The Carey Foundation, which provides funding for daily cancer-related expenses like the cost of counseling, transportation to treatment, and daycare during therapy.

You can check out some of the #Dare2Tutu pictures submitted so far on Instagram. I love them!

Cheers to Bob and Linda for the beautiful reminder that love, support, and humor really have no limits.

We can all do our part to share some happy, positive vibes with others. Get started!

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.