When his wife was diagnosed with breast cancer, Bob put on a tutu and went straight for the laughs.

"Excuse me sir, are you wearing anything under your tutu?" the police officer asked.

The man responded, "Yes, officer, I am wearing my pink shorts that match my pink tutu."


You never know what you'll see in NYC, or anywhere, with the tutu man. All photos via Bob Carey, used with permission.

The man rocking the pink tutu is named Bob Carey, and for over 10 years, he's been running around in it for a very special person: his wife, Linda.

When Linda was diagnosed with breast cancer, Bob, a photographer, did two of the things he knew how to do best: He got out his camera and his silly humor.

As a coping mechanism and to show support to his wife during her battle, he started taking photos of himself in a light pink tutu in the most random places — no matter the temperature or location.

You can't help but smile at his effort.

And that's the entire point. It's no wonder The Tutu Project has become such a hit.

"When Linda would go for treatment, she would take the images on her phone, and the women would look at them, and it would make them laugh and make the time pass," Bob says about the project.

Bob's been dancing around all over the place:

On the Coney Island boardwalk.


In an Arizona parking lot.


Standing on water.

Hanging on for dear life.

Making new friends in Germany.

Making new friends who speak in "moo."

Wandering around a football stadium.

Stranded in the desert.

The photos have been shared and admired all over the world. And it's not just about the laughs they create — it's about how they serve as a way to reach out to one another and show support.

"Oddly enough, her cancer has taught us that life is good, dealing with it can be hard, and sometimes the very best thing — no, the only thing — we can do to face another day is to laugh at ourselves and share a laugh with others," Bob says

But Bob isn't the only one in a tutu anymore. More laughs are being shared than ever before with the launch of the #Dare2Tutu campaign.

Here's how it works: People from all over the world are daring each other to wear a tutu and take a picture of it, tagging it with #Dare2Tutu. They're also encouraging donations to their nonprofit, The Carey Foundation, which provides funding for daily cancer-related expenses like the cost of counseling, transportation to treatment, and daycare during therapy.

You can check out some of the #Dare2Tutu pictures submitted so far on Instagram. I love them!

Cheers to Bob and Linda for the beautiful reminder that love, support, and humor really have no limits.

We can all do our part to share some happy, positive vibes with others. Get started!

Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less
via The Walt Disney Company / Flickr

One of the ways to tell if you're in a healthy relationship is whether you and your partner are free to talk about other people you find attractive. For many couples, bringing up such a sensitive topic can cause some major jealousy.

Of course, there's a healthy way to approach such a potentially dangerous topic.

Telling your partner you find someone else attractive shouldn't be about making them feel jealous. It's probably also best that if you're attracted to a coworker, friend, or their sibling, that you keep it to yourself.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less