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What Obama And George W. Bush Have In Common

Okay, this is a tough one to talk about. Since 2004, the United States Armed Forces have been using unmanned combat air vehicles (also known as “drones”) to kill people in Pakistan. Drone strikes have actually increased under Obama’s presidency, and while they are more precise (read: less civilian casualties), in my mind they represent a scary future of warfare. They make war an easier, and less personal, decision. Share this if you think it’s a subject worth talking about.

What you see below are screenshots of an interactive map set up by Slate’s Chris Kirk, which compare drone strikes from Bush (red) and Obama (blue). Lighter colors around a circle means some non-militants — aka civilians — were killed in that strike. Here's one of Obama's attacks:


And here's one of Bush's attacks:

Don't forget to check out the interactive map. Once you’re there, click on a circle to see details about the strike, including the administration responsible, the date, the location, and the number of militants and non-militants killed.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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