The Democratic National Convention brought some progressive heavy hitters to the City of Brotherly Love.

Michelle Obama, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Joe Biden, President Obama, and all the fun celebrities (sorry, RNC, but Ugly Betty beats Chachi every. single. time.) journeyed to Philadelphia to officially nominate Hillary Clinton for president.

But like the Republican National Convention, the DNC was a lot to digest for our country's youngest citizens.


There was shouting, bitterness, cheering, plenty of gavels, a few musical interludes, tears, and a historical moment or two. So what did children make of the Democratic side of the presidential ticket?

We went ahead and asked. And with crayons, markers, and a few illustrated glass ceilings, they gave it to us straight.

8-year-old Mabel's drawing of Sen. Bernie Sanders is just like being there (without the jeers and chants, of course).

Illustration by Mabel for Upworthy.

Abigail, 6, perfectly captured the hopeful spirit in the Wells Fargo Center as Clinton closed out the night.

Illustration by Abigail for Upworthy.

Their illustrative thoughts on this week's events are a must-see.


As we enter the real campaign season, we can always look to little ones to keep us grounded. Their honesty, clarity, and colorful take on life is something we could always use a little bit more of, especially as divisive messaging and bitterness attempt to tear us apart.

So let's listen, be respectful, and do right by the next generation.

They're not just watching us. They're counting on us.

Photo by Li-An Lim on Unsplash
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via LeapsMag / Instagram

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Photo by Li-An Lim on Unsplash
True

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