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There's never been a Broadway musical with a bigger impact than "Hamilton" — at least in recent memory.

And there has never been a more crucial presidential election in recent memory either. Marry the two and you get this powerful parody from the show's creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Lin-Manuel Miranda taking a bow after one of his performances. Image by Nicholas Hunt/Getty images.


This summer, Miranda wrote and directed three videos to get out the vote. This is the first one he's released. It's a fun, hopeful, and oh-so-danceable rap inviting all of us to vote in November.

Check out the 30-second music video, featuring Miranda, posted on actor Javier Muñoz's Twitter page.

It's in Spanish, so here's the English translation:

"Come, my people, come, my people
It's time to elect a new president
Vote, my people, vote, my people
Raise your hand and say, "present!"
Come, my people, come, my people,
Don't let this country not count us all
Come, my people, come, my people
The 8th of November is at the forefront
Vote, vote — America!
The time is now
Decide who exists"









At this point, Miranda's popularity is a massive force to be reckoned with.

We've seen him hanging out everywhere from Broadway to the White House, and he's even hosting "Saturday Night Live" this October. So, yeah, he's kind of a big deal.

And he's also quickly gaining a reputation for using his high-profile status to bring awareness to the social issues that really matter, like voting. On Sept. 28, 2016, four "Hamilton" cast members even sat outside the Richard Rodgers Theatre to register people to vote.

Miranda's video is aimed in particular at the 27.3 million Latinos who are eligible to vote in the next election.

Out of those 27.3 million Latinos eligible to vote, 44% (almost half) are millennials. And because "Hamilton" is to millennials what "Rent" and "Les Miserables" were to theatre-goers of previous generations, Miranda's power is far-reaching.

And as for Miranda's personal views on this election? He's backing Hillary Clinton — even signing on for a star-studded Broadway event in her honor on Oct. 17, 2016. But regardless of who you're voting for, Miranda is determined, telling TIME magazine “Just get out and vote."

Let's listen to the man, shall we?

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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