Watch Eagles of Death Metal make an inspiring return to Paris.

It's been only three weeks since terrorists stormed the Bataclan Theater in Paris and killed 89 people at a packed concert.

Last night, the band at that concert, Eagles of Death Metal, returned to play Patti Smith's "People Have the Power" with U2 at their show in Paris.


On Tuesday, the band also visited the Bataclan to pay tribute to the victims.

Eagles of Death Metal's name is still on the Bataclan marquee. Photo by Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images.

A few days after the attack at their concert, the Eagles of Death Metal posted an announcement to Facebook canceling all shows until further notice: "While the band is now home safe, we are horrified and still trying to come to terms with what happened in France."

Despite narrowly surviving and experiencing an "unimaginable ordeal," the band spoke of the people who had helped them, "proving once again that love overshadows evil."

And they're not letting some terrorists divide them.

The concert and the band's visit to the memorial are astounding, beautiful examples of the power of human resilience.

Eagles of Death Metal's Jesse Hughes and Dave Catching at the memorial for victims of the Bataclan concert hall attack. Photo by Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images.

If this concert appearance seemed like it was out of the blue, it was actually a couple weeks in the making.

According to the BBC, right after the attacks, U2 flew the EODM members back to the United States on their private jet and even bought them cellphones to replace the ones they had lost in the attack.

U2, who were scheduled to perform the day after the attacks, had also rescheduled their concert dates. But with EODM last night, they made it clear that the show must go on.

"They reminded us that the bad guys never take a day off, and therefore we rock 'n rollers cannot either," said EODM lead singer Jesse Hughes, as quoted by BBC.

"These are our brothers. Our fellow troubadours," said legendary U2 frontman Bono as he introduced the band. "They were robbed of their stage three weeks ago, and we would like to offer them ours tonight. Would you welcome the Eagles of Death Metal!"

Upon taking the stage, Hughes shared his gratitude with the crowd, saying, "We love you too, so much, for giving us this opportunity. I look around and what do I see, nos amis, our friends. I f---ing love you guys so hard, and I will never stop rocking and rolling."

Eagles of Death Metal's Jesse Hughes at the memorial for victims of the Bataclan concert hall attack. Photo by Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images.

After making a surprise appearance at a U2 concert, EODM drummer Julian Dorio and Matt McJunkins visit the memorial to the Bataclan concert hall victims in Paris. Photo by Miguel Median/AFP/Getty Images.

Photo by Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images.

The song that both bands chose to perform is about unity and peace:

"I believe everything we dream,
can come to pass through our union,
we can turn the world around,
we can turn the earth's revolution,
we have the power,
People have the power."




In a world where an Islamist terrorist organization carries out attacks to provoke others against the very people they claim to be fighting for, in a world where we have a presidential candidates calling Mexican immigrants criminals and for a ban on all Muslims entering the United States, it's important that we take this message of unity and brotherhood to heart.

We have the power to go on, with love and compassion.

Watch Eagle of Death Metal's appearance at the Paris U2 concert below:

The process of transforming a world where injustice persists into one where justice reigns is a long, slow, multi-faceted one. Much of it is invisible work, and progress is often two steps forward, one step back.

But occasionally, a project comes along that is both a symbolic and practical manifestation of change. The Echo Project in Laurens, South Carolina is one of those projects.

In 1996, the Redneck Shop and "World's Only Klan Museum" was opened in the historic Echo Theater in Laurens. The Echo had been a segregated theater during the Jim Crow era, and the town of Laurens itself was named for a wealthy slave-trader, Henry Laurens, so perhaps that shouldn't be surprising. But still.

With Confederate flags flying and a swastika hanging on the back wall, the Redneck Shop sold racist clothing, bumper stickers, KKK robes, and other paraphernalia to neo-Nazis for years.

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Lainey and baby goat Annie. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse
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Oftentimes, the journey to our true calling is winding and unexpected. Take Lainey Morse, who went from office manager to creator of the viral trend, Goat Yoga, thanks to her natural affinity for goats and throwing parties.

Back in 2015, Lainey bought a farm in Oregon and got her first goats who she named Ansel and Adams. "Once I got them, I was obsessed," says Lainey. "It was hard to get me off the farm to go do anything else."

Right away, she noticed what a calming presence they had. "Even the way they chew their cud is relaxing to be around because it's very methodical," she says. Lainey was going through a divorce and dealing with a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis at the time, but even when things got particularly hard, the goats provided relief.

"I found it impossible to be stressed or depressed when I was with them."

She started inviting friends up to the farm for what she called "Goat Happy Hour." Soon, the word spread about Lainey's delightful, stress-relieving furry friends. At one point, she auctioned off a child's birthday party at her farm, and the mom asked if they could do yoga with the goats. And lo, the idea for goat yoga was born.

A baby goat on a yoga student. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse

Goat yoga went viral so much so that by fall of 2016, Lainey was able to quit her office manager job at a remodeling company to manage her burgeoning goat yoga business full-time. Now she has 10 locations nationwide.

Lainey handles the backend management for all of her locations, and loves that side of the business too, even though it's less goat-related. "I still have my own personal Goat Happy Hour every single day so I still get to spend a lot of time with my goats," says Lainey. "I get the best of both worlds."

Lainey with her goat Fabio. Photo courtesy of Lainey Morse

Since COVID-19 hit, her locations have had to close temporarily. She hopes her yoga locations will be able to resume classes in the spring when the vaccine is more widely available. "I think people will need goat yoga more than ever before, because everyone has been through so much stress in 2020," says Lainey.

Major life changes like Lainey's can come around for any number of reasons. Even if they seem out of left field to some, it doesn't mean they're not the right moves for you. The new FOX series "Call Me Kat", which premieres Sunday, January 3rd after NFL and will continue on Thursday nights beginning January 7th, exemplifies that. The show is centered around Kat, a 39-year old single woman played by Mayim Bialik, who quit her math professor job and spent her life's savings to pursue her dreams to open a Cat Café in Louisville, Kentucky.

Jeff Harry started making similar moves when he was just 10-years-old, and kept making them throughout his life. After seeing the movie "Big,"Jeff knew he wanted to play with toys for a living, so he started writing toy companies asking for next steps. He finally got a response when he was a sophomore in high school — the company told him he needed to become a mechanical engineer first.

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