Watch Eagles of Death Metal make an inspiring return to Paris.

It's been only three weeks since terrorists stormed the Bataclan Theater in Paris and killed 89 people at a packed concert.

Last night, the band at that concert, Eagles of Death Metal, returned to play Patti Smith's "People Have the Power" with U2 at their show in Paris.


On Tuesday, the band also visited the Bataclan to pay tribute to the victims.

Eagles of Death Metal's name is still on the Bataclan marquee. Photo by Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images.

A few days after the attack at their concert, the Eagles of Death Metal posted an announcement to Facebook canceling all shows until further notice: "While the band is now home safe, we are horrified and still trying to come to terms with what happened in France."

Despite narrowly surviving and experiencing an "unimaginable ordeal," the band spoke of the people who had helped them, "proving once again that love overshadows evil."

And they're not letting some terrorists divide them.

The concert and the band's visit to the memorial are astounding, beautiful examples of the power of human resilience.

Eagles of Death Metal's Jesse Hughes and Dave Catching at the memorial for victims of the Bataclan concert hall attack. Photo by Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images.

If this concert appearance seemed like it was out of the blue, it was actually a couple weeks in the making.

According to the BBC, right after the attacks, U2 flew the EODM members back to the United States on their private jet and even bought them cellphones to replace the ones they had lost in the attack.

U2, who were scheduled to perform the day after the attacks, had also rescheduled their concert dates. But with EODM last night, they made it clear that the show must go on.

"They reminded us that the bad guys never take a day off, and therefore we rock 'n rollers cannot either," said EODM lead singer Jesse Hughes, as quoted by BBC.

"These are our brothers. Our fellow troubadours," said legendary U2 frontman Bono as he introduced the band. "They were robbed of their stage three weeks ago, and we would like to offer them ours tonight. Would you welcome the Eagles of Death Metal!"

Upon taking the stage, Hughes shared his gratitude with the crowd, saying, "We love you too, so much, for giving us this opportunity. I look around and what do I see, nos amis, our friends. I f---ing love you guys so hard, and I will never stop rocking and rolling."

Eagles of Death Metal's Jesse Hughes at the memorial for victims of the Bataclan concert hall attack. Photo by Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images.

After making a surprise appearance at a U2 concert, EODM drummer Julian Dorio and Matt McJunkins visit the memorial to the Bataclan concert hall victims in Paris. Photo by Miguel Median/AFP/Getty Images.

Photo by Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images.

The song that both bands chose to perform is about unity and peace:

"I believe everything we dream,
can come to pass through our union,
we can turn the world around,
we can turn the earth's revolution,
we have the power,
People have the power."




In a world where an Islamist terrorist organization carries out attacks to provoke others against the very people they claim to be fighting for, in a world where we have a presidential candidates calling Mexican immigrants criminals and for a ban on all Muslims entering the United States, it's important that we take this message of unity and brotherhood to heart.

We have the power to go on, with love and compassion.

Watch Eagle of Death Metal's appearance at the Paris U2 concert below:

True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Sir David Attenborough has one of the most recognized and beloved voices in the world. The British broadcaster and nature historian has spent most of his 94 years on Earth educating humanity about the wonders of the natural world, inspiring multiple generations to care about the planet we all call home.

And now, Attenborough has made a new name for himself. Not only has he joined the cool kids on Instagram, he's broken the record for reaching a million followers in the shortest period. It only took four hours and 44 minutes, which is less time than it took Jennifer Aniston, who held the title before him at 5 hours and 16 minutes.

A day later, Attenborough is sitting at a whopping 3.4 million followers. And he only has two Instagram posts so far, both of them videos. But just watch his first one and you'll see why he's attracted so many fans.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


There are very few people who have had quite as memorable a life as Arnold Schwarzenegger. His adult life has played out in four acts, with each one arguably more consequential than the last.

And now Schwarzenegger wants to play a role in helping America, his adopted home, ensure that our 2020 election is safe, secure and available to everyone willing and able to vote.

Shortly after immigrating to America, Schwarzenegger rose up to become the most famous bodybuilder in history, turning what was largely a sideshow attraction into a legitimate sport. He then pivoted to an acting career, becoming Hollywood's highest paid star in a run that spanned three decades.


Keep Reading Show less

One night in 2018, Sheila and Steve Albers took their two youngest sons out to dinner. Their 17-year-old son, John, was in a crabby mood—not an uncommon occurrence for the teen who struggled with mental health issues—so he stayed home.

A half hour later, Sheila's started getting text messages that John wasn't safe. He had posted messages with suicidal ideations on social media and his friends had called the police to check on him. The Albers immediately raced home.

When they got there, they were met with a surreal scene. Their minivan was in the neighbor's yard across the street. John had been shot in the driver's seat six times by a police officer who had arrived to check on him. The officer had fired two shots as the teen slowly backed the van out of the garage, then 11 more after the van spun around backward. But all the officers told the Albers was that John had "passed" and had been shot. They wouldn't find out until the next day who had shot and killed him.

Keep Reading Show less