Watch Broadway stars record a song for the victims of the Orlando shooting.

The June 12, 2016, shooting at Orlando's Pulse nightclub came as a shock to the world — a senseless act of hate. The response to the tragedy, however, has been heartening. Within days, more than $4 million was raised for victims and their families on the crowdfunding site GoFundMe. Major League Baseball's Tampa Bay Rays honored the city during their annual Pride Night game. Across the country, and across the world, people have responded to the tragedy with love and empathy for the LGBTQ community.

Just three days after the shooting, some of Broadway's biggest talents came together to offer a message so simple and yet so perfect: Love must prevail.

Broadway stars Idina Menzel, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Audra McDonald, Sara Bareilles, Kristen Bell, Sean Hayes, Gloria Estefan, Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick, Billy Porter, and Bernadette Peters were among the dozens of singers who gathered on June 15, at New York's Avatar Studios to record a version of Burt Bacharach and Hal David's classic song, "What the World Needs Now Is Love."


Proceeds from MP3 sales will benefit the GLBT Center of Central Florida.

As of June 19, (prior to the song's release) the Center has collected nearly $425,000 in victim relief donations, which are being used to support the needs of victims' families, like air travel, child care, funeral services, health care costs, and counseling, among other services.

When you watch the performance, you can’t help but feel a little choked up. It’s inspiring to see that in response to one person's darkest, most violent actions, humanity can still come together in an effort to win with the power of love.

Even more, the song is an inspiring reminder to take action and prevent the next tragedy from happening.

Whether the action it inspires is downloading the song, supporting local GBLT centers, calling members of Congress to discuss gun safety measures and anti-LGBT discrimination, or something less tangible like inspiring respect for people who are different or making sure to share kindness in the face of pain, it is an emotional reminder that love must prevail — not just in the wake of tragedies, but always.

Watch Broadway for Orlando perform "What the World Needs Now Is Love" below.

Broadway for Orlando's "What the World Needs Now Is Love" can be purchased at the Broadway Records website.

Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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Image by 5540867 from Pixabay

Figuring out what to do for a mom on Mother's Day can be a tricky thing. There's the standard flowers or candy, of course, and taking her out to a nice brunch is a fairly universal winner. But what do moms really want?

Speaking from experience—my kids range from age 12 to 20—a lot depends on the stage of motherhood. What I wanted when my kids were little is different than what I want now, and I'm sure when my kids are grown and gone I'll want something different again.

We asked our readers to share what they want for Mother's Day, and while the answers were varied, there were some common themes that emerged.

Moms of young kids want a break.

When your kids are little, motherhood is relentless. Precious and adorable, yes. Wonderful and rewarding, absolutely. But it's a LOT. And it's a lot all the fricking time.

Most moms I know would love the gift of alone time, either away at a hotel or Airbnb or in their own home with no one else around. Time alone is a priceless commodity at this stage, especially if it comes with someone else taking care of cleaning, making sure the kids are fed and safe and occupied, doing the laundry, etc.

This is especially true after more than a year of pandemic living, where we moms have spent more time than usual at home with our offspring. While in some ways that's been great, again, it's a lot.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less