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Watch Andy Grammer's new music video here first, filmed on Skid Row.

Andy Grammer gave makeovers to folks who are homeless in his new music video, and it was awesome.

Andy Grammer is a pretty famous singer-songwriter.

You've probably heard some of his hit songs: "Fine by Me," "Keep Your Head Up," and "Honey, I’m Good."

Now he’s back with a new single and an inspiring video, too.


Grammer at the 2015 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Awards. Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images.

His new love song, "Fresh Eyes," digs deep into the hearts of listeners to open their eyes to the pain and struggles of folks who are homeless in Los Angeles.

Grammer explained why he turned his love song into an opportunity to close the divide between society and the homeless: "I was a street performer in Santa Monica," he said. "I’d talk to homeless people a lot.  I’d eat pizza with them … it wasn’t us and them anymore. It was just us."

All photos by Ryan Bradley/Rubrik House.

Grammer wanted to change people’s perceptions of folks who are homeless, so he decided to focus his new music video on their lives.

He teamed up with Union Rescue Mission of Los Angeles and went to Skid Row to give the folks who lived there the attention, love, and care they desperately needed.

Union Rescue Mission works hard to care for the over 45,000 people who are homeless on the streets of Los Angeles. With Grammer’s help, the organization gave people makeovers and lifted their spirits for a day.

"I was trying to get to know them … make them smile and make them laugh," Grammer said. He said he had the chance to speak with a man named Michael about how he felt after his makeover.  Michael told him, "I feel human ... for a change."

Grammer hopes this video will inspire others to see the homeless folks in their neighborhoods with "fresh eyes."

"If you want to have the best day you’ve ever had, go there [Skid Row] and give something away," he said.

Check out his new music video, premiering exclusively on Upworthy:

Andy Grammer gives a voice to the voiceless by spreading love and kindness to those who are homeless in his new video, "Fresh Eyes." An Upworthy exclusive.

Posted by Upworthy on Wednesday, October 19, 2016

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