Picture this: Legislators for the great state of Utah gather in their chamber wondering, “How do we get young people to care about laws?”

And then, a mysterious voice from the shadows whispers, “Make a rap. It will be fun," before spraying a cloud of some kind of cartoonish "agreeability mist" into the air and scampering back to an evil lair.

And somehow, before the agreeability mist wore off, these seemingly reasonable lawmakers set to work on writing, filming, editing, and releasing the best/worst rap video of all time.


That is the only way to explain how this could have happened.

OK, maybe not. But it’s probably the story they should stick to. GIFs via Utah House of Reps/Twitter.

Legislators from the Utah House of Representatives debuted their first hip-hop single Feb. 28.

It’s a "Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" send-up called "Fresh Prints of Bills Here" and it's about how a bill becomes a law. It is — and I say this with near 100% certainty — the best thing you will see all week. (Or maybe the worst?)

There are fake bills.

A surprising amount of Comic Sans.

(Or if you're familiar with local government, maybe it's not surprising.)

[rebelmouse-image 19495046 dam="1" original_size="500x281" caption="Damn it, Jerry! GIF from "Parks and Recreation."" expand=1]Damn it, Jerry! GIF from "Parks and Recreation."

There's a poorly choreographed thumbs-up.

But not as poor as the fit on this MAGA cap.

The wordplay is FIRE. They even rhyme "there" with "chamber"

(Yeah, they made it chame-bear. THERE ARE NO RULES!)

Plus, there's this Jason Sudeikis doppleganger, in a backward hat, making what he undoubtedly thinks is a cool rap hand gesture. IT IS HARD TO BELIEVE THIS CONTENT IS FREE.

And we can't forget Rep. Susan Duckworth, who appears to be the only person who can stay within 10 feet of the beat.

Go off, Susan!

Basically the video has everything but black people. (But can you blame Rep. Sandra Hollins for sitting this one out?)

But (and I'll admit this is a big but) if you can get past the dancing, cringeworthy rhymes, and hilarious hats, the video actually has a lot to offer.

Sure, a mostly negative reaction to the political parody was swift, with Stephen Colbert discussing it on his show and one of Utah's U.S. Senate candidates, Jenny Wilson, promising to never appear in a rap video if she's elected.

But if "Schoolhouse Rock!" was before your time, this video offers a succinct and useful breakdown of the legislative process.

It's also a great way for people to get to know their elected officials. In a 2015 survey, nearly 77% of respondents could not name one of their state senators. Yikes! These are the people responsible for a lot of the laws and policies that affect our daily lives. Knowing who represents you (and how they're doing) is key to making sure your voice is heard. This video offers a chance to match names to faces or at least names to stuck-out tongues — and that's a start.

To the good people of Utah, as ridiculous and cringeworthy as this video is, hats off to you.

Specifically, the backward one. Take it off. You'll thank me later.

Check out the video in full. Who am I kidding? You'll have to. It's impossible to turn away.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

Keep Reading Show less

Images from Denver Animal Shelter's Facebook page.

Imagine rummaging through secondhand finds in your local thrift store, only to find that some items include a bonus feline at no extra charge.

Montequlla the orange tabby had somehow not gotten the memo that he and his family were moving. As they dropped off furniture, including a big recliner chair, to the Denver Arc Thrift Store on New Year’s Eve, they had no idea that poor little Montequlla was tucked away inside.

Luckily, the staff began to notice the chair meowing.

Keep Reading Show less

"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

Keep Reading Show less