Searching for a job, especially as an 18 year-old with little or no experience, is a daunting process under the very best of circumstances.

Unfortunately for Megan Dixon of Leicester, UK, the cruel response she got after one interview left her shaken, then frustrated.

Dixon sat for an interview at Miller and Carter Steakhouse to hopefully join the restaurant as a server. According to Mashable, Dixon was told the assistant manager with whom she spoke would get back to her in a few day's time.


However, not one minute after leaving the interview, she received the following text from that person:

Image via The Sun

The snide messages clearly mock her speaking patterns and offers the completely subjective and pejorative characterization that Dixon came across as “basic" in the meeting, which seems unprofessional, at best.

According to The Sun, a restaurant spokesperson claims that the restaurant intended the message to be sent internally to the establishment's manager, offering, “We can't apologise enough to Megan."

Conveying it was more the principle of their response than its mean-spirited tone, Megan responded: “Maybe because I'm 18 she thinks it's OK not to be professional with me? I don't know."

“I was shocked. The least she should have given me was some proper feedback."

A word of warning to any prospective employers thinking they can get away with rude or dismissive behavior to someone just because they're young and / or female — don't. They know how to fight back.

This story was originally appeared on GOOD.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


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Image via

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