This smart toddler understands Planned Parenthood way better than those trying to defund it.

This week, thousands of people wore pink to stand with Planned Parenthood. As the organization continued to come under attack from legislators who want to defund it, supporters from all walks of life took to their social media feeds to show their appreciation for the invaluable women's health care provider.

And little Zuri wasn't about to be left out.


The toddler daughter of poet and activist Staceyann Chin was determined to show her support for Planned Parenthood too. She joined her mama in a four-minute video titled "Why We Stand with Planned Parenthood" and what ensued is one the most adorable — and brilliantly simple — statements of support ever.

Zuri starts off strong.

Why does she stand with Planned Parenthood?

Pretty simple. Every part of her body from her shoulders to her "little boobies," she confidently claims are hers and hers alone.

She was really happy when her mom mentioned that she has the right to doctors who support her choices.

Ultimately, she supports Planned Parenthood because she believes that we need to do one thing:

So she makes a desperate plea:


And then, OK, yes, sure, Zuri got a bit carried away and couldn't contain her joy over the weather outside her window.

But her mother got her back on track:

And with that, Zuri came back with a serious call to action:

Zuri's words were so powerful that Cecile Richards, President of Planned Parenthood, quoted them directly in a tweet to the little girl and her mother:


Zuri's words weren't just cute. They were important.

They boiled down the debate over the value of women's health care and reproductive rights to a pretty simple affirmation of women's bodily autonomy: the right to own ourselves, take care of ourselves, and love ourselves.

Now if only we could get Congress to believe us.

Go ahead and take a few minutes to hear more from Zuri — including an epic song about why she's loves being beautiful. It's pretty good stuff.

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Disney has come under fire for problematic portrayals of non-white and non-western cultures in many of its older movies. They aren't the only one, of course, but since their movies are an iconic part of most American kids' childhoods, Disney's messaging holds a lot of power.

Fortunately, that power can be used for good, and Disney can serve as an example to other companies if they learn from their mistakes, account for their misdeeds, and do the right thing going forward. Without getting too many hopes up, it appears that the entertainment giant may have actually done just that with the new Frozen II film.

According to NOW Toronto, the producers of Frozen II have entered into a contract with the Sámi people—the Indigenous people of the Scandinavian regions—to ensure that they portray the culture with respect.

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Though there was not a direct portrayal of the Sámi in the first Frozen movie, the choral chant that opens the film was inspired by an ancient Sámi vocal tradition. In addition, the clothing worn by Kristoff closely resembled what a Sámi reindeer herder would wear. The inclusion of these elements of Sámi culture with no context or acknowledgement sparked conversations about cultural appropriation and erasure on social media.

Frozen II features Indigenous culture much more directly, and even addressed the issue of Indigenous erasure. Filmmakers Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck, along with producer Peter Del Vecho, consulted with experts on how to do that respectfully—the experts, of course, being the Sámi people themselves.

Sámi leaders met with Disney producer Peter Del Vecho in September 2019.Sámediggi Sametinget/Flickr

The Sámi parliaments of Norway, Sweden and Finland, and the non-governmental Saami Council reached out to the filmmakers when they found out their culture would be highlighted in the film. They formed a Sámi expert advisory group, called Verddet, to assist filmmakers in with how to accurately and respectfully portray Sámi culture, history, and society.

In a contract signed by Walt Disney Animation Studios and Sámi leaders, the Sámi stated their position that "their collective and individual culture, including aesthetic elements, music, language, stories, histories, and other traditional cultural expressions are property that belong to the Sámi," and "that to adequately respect the rights that the Sámi have to and in their culture, it is necessary to ensure sensitivity, allow for free, prior, and informed consent, and ensure that adequate benefit sharing is employed."

RELATED: This aboriginal Australian used kindness and tea to trump the racism he overheard.

Disney agreed to work with the advisory group, to produce a version of Frozen II in one Sámi language, as well as to "pursue cross-learning opportunities" and "arrange for contributions back to the Sámi society."

Anne Lájla Utsi, managing director at the International Sámi Film Institute, was part of the Verddet advisory group. She told NOW, "This is a good example of how a big, international company like Disney acknowledges the fact that we own our own culture and stories. It hasn't happened before."

"Disney's team really wanted to make it right," said Utsi. "They didn't want to make any mistakes or hurt anybody. We felt that they took it seriously. And the film shows that. We in Verddet are truly proud of this collaboration."

Sounds like you've done well this time, Disney. Let's hope such cultural sensitivity and collaboration continues, and that other filmmakers and production companies will follow suit.

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