This mom has an emotional, must-read message about the 'beautiful chaos' of raising kids.

One day, you’re going to miss it.

One day, there will be a peaceful silence while you go to the bathroom instead of small hands busting through the door or someone wailing bloody murder outside with an owie until you jump off the toilet holding your pants in a panic.


One day, you’ll miss the frantic desperation of never catching up because one day, everything will catch up.

Your children will grow up and you will get a decent break. So savor the good times now, right? Not so easy.

I tell myself all the time that one day I'll miss it.

I repeat the mantra when I’m on the verge of losing my sh*t. The phrase keeps me going because no matter how cliché it sounds, it’s true. I need this running thought in my head — especially now on summer break — as the circus is up and running.

One day, there won’t be baskets of laundry overflowing with play clothes, gym clothes, or uniforms. One day, there won’t be endless piles of dishes in the sink.

You’re going to miss it.

You’re going to miss someone needing you all the time. You’re going to miss being called out for all things great and small.

One day, there won’t be anyone around to worry about entertaining on school breaks because they’ll have their own lives, friends, and passions.

That life you think you can’t wait for now — perhaps for time alone with your spouse, time alone with yourself, or just some time, period — will come, and then it will all be done.

All the irritation over mud on the floor, stains on the carpet, or messy rooms never cleaned will be washed away with the tides of life.

Maybe you can’t muster the feelings of cherishing the moment with your loud, messy, chatty children today, but it does help to keep in mind that it will pass, and one day you are going to miss it.

You’re going to miss dropping them off or picking them up from school. You’re going to miss their scrunched-up, disgusted faces when they see what you’ve made for dinner. You’re going to miss being called into their room for the 10th time asking for a glass of water, another hug, a third story, or to excitedly tell you the sudden revelation they just had.

You’re going to miss all those endless questions because, for a time, they do actually think you know everything. This won’t last forever, of course.

One day, they will hopefully have the confidence to do most things without you.

So the next time you feel like screaming, yelling, or running out the door because no one is listening to you about cleaning up, just tell yourself that there will come a time when you will miss the maddening, beautiful chaos.

It might help a little to ease your sense of hopelessness on those particularly hectic days that are not kind to your sanity.

While it may not be possible to fully enjoy all the moments that come to you as a parent, it’s definitely possible to know that one day, you will miss this.

This story first appeared on the Huffington Post and is reprinted here with permission.

An unsuspecting guy at a shopping mall Zales got the surprise of his life this week while trying to pay off part of his engagement ring.

As the young man talked with the clerk at the jewelry store counter about how much he still owed for his ring and when he'd be able to pay it off, an extraordinarily large hand handed the clerk a credit card. Shaquille O'Neal, the 7' 1'' basketball legend known colloquially as "Shaq," overheard their conversation and decided to take care of the bill himself. No big announcement. No fanfare. He just handed over his credit card, shook the stunned customer's hand and patted him on the back, and that was that.

Someone caught the moment on video and shared it, which prompted Shaq's co-hosts on NBA on TNT to ask him about it the next day.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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