This is how depression can affect a person's day-to-day.

This story was originally published on The Mighty.

Living with depression is difficult for a myriad reasons as one experiences symptoms, including weight changes, disrupted sleep patterns, disinterest, apathy, etc.  

But a life with depression is evident in even more subtle ways. How is depression reflected in our everyday tasks? What tiny changes occur in the lives of those who have depression that end up dismantling their entire support system?


Here are 10 ways depression is reflected subtly in daily lives:

1. You stop using products you usually use daily.

A number of old lotions, makeup, and toiletries remain sealed, even after the expiration date.

2. Something smells bad.

The fridge is full of food gone bad. You promise to use everything the next time you go grocery shopping. But you don’t.

3. People ask if you’re sick.

You’ve begun to care less about your appearances and hygiene with each passing day. Having a “personal style” seems exhausting.

4. Your room starts to get messy.

Your personal space is cluttered and messy. It needs cleaning far more frequently than you can manage.

5. The barista can’t hear you.

The strength in your voice subsides. Ordering a coffee is a challenge with your soft voice. To make matters worse, you slur words sometimes.

6. You have no clean clothes.

That pile of laundry has been sitting in the corner for longer than you can remember. It will quite possibly sit there until your last favorite pair of shorts needs washing too.

7. The garbage is overflowing.

Your garbage can is full of wrappers from junk food. You hope no one goes dumpster-diving in your garbage; it would be embarrassing for anyone to see how many chips you eat.

8. You start getting behind with work.

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Your school work, work assignments, and tasks are all past due. You tell yourself the next time around you’ll get on it first thing. But even you know you can’t.

9. You start canceling plans.

You are a master at making excuses for work, social meetings, and school. What’s the point in going when no one can hear your soft voice anyway?

10. It’s hard to get in touch with you.

Answering phone calls? Answering doors? The anxiety that sets in every time the bell or phone rings goes through the roof.

These are only some of the ways depression can be reflected in people’s lives. Not everyone is the same and neither is their depression.

Making changes to these small fallbacks is the first step toward confidence, self-love, self-appreciation, and a healthier, fuller life. You deserve it.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.