She tried dropping the mic on Facebook for banning her boss Alex Jones. Looks like it landed on her foot.

InfoWars reporter Millie Weaver is understandably upset that Facebook, Spotify and other platforms have chosen to remove her company and its controversial leader Alex Jones from their platforms.

However, in a back-and-forth on Twitter, she personally attacked her critics saying Facebook had no right to right to ban InfoWars because it is a “publicly owned” company.


“There's a thing called fact-checking,” Weaver wrote on Twitter. “Facebook is a public business that's publicly traded. Using that argument to justify banning Alex Jones doesn't work.”

Needless to say, people had some thoughts on her attempt to explain the difference between public and private entities. In just 24 hours, more than 11,000 people had commented on her initial tweet. What followed was a lesson in the basics of civic discourse.

People on social media responded with humor and facts about what it means to be “private” vs. “public.”

Weaver later tried to clarify her original tweet but people weren't buying it. In a bit of delicious irony, Simon Maloy put the discussion effectively to bed by declaring: "Ironically this has become a lesson in being publicly owned."

We need a healthy political debate. But it should be based on facts and ideas, not insults and conspiracy theories.

Social media is rarely the best place for authentic, meaningful debate. More often than not it tends to be about scoring points and aligning oneself with their chosen tribe.

It doesn't have to be that way.

At the same time, we're only going to renew our civil discourse if we return to a more universal respect for and understanding of the facts.

And it appears that getting there might just require a history lesson and a few laughs along the way.

As face masks have become mandatory in many places to limit the spread of coronavirus, it's also become an increasingly politicized thing. As we know, anything that involves political polarization also involves vast amounts of misinformation and disinformation. Whose idea was the internet again?

No one I know loves wearing a mask. We all wish we didn't have to. But there are an awful lot of people saying they can't wear one, or they refuse to wear one because they've been led to believe that masks are somehow more dangerous than not wearing one. I've seen and read "information" on everything from masks depriving people of oxygen to masks causing CO2 build up to masks creating fungus problems.

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