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This incredible speech shows why Harvey Weinstein was the biggest loser at the Oscars.

Judd, Hayek, and Sciorra delivered a must-watch speech for the Time's Up era.

During the first Oscars of the #MeToo/Time's Up era, three of Harvey Weinstein's accusers took the stage to deliver a speech we all needed to hear.

About a day before the ceremony, it was announced that actresses Ashley Judd, Salma Hayek, and Annabella Sciorra would appear as presenters. The women had one thing in common: They'd all spoken out about being harassed or assaulted by Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.

As allegations against Weinstein rolled in, the three actresses each shared their stories of assault at the producer's hands. In December, The New York Times published Hayek's firsthand account of her experience with Weinstein. In October, Sciorra, best known for her Emmy-nominated role on "The Sopranos," opened up to The New Yorker about being raped and harassed by Weinstein. That same month, Judd spoke with ABC's Diane Sawyer, retelling her experience as a young actress sexually harassed by a man with the ability to destroy her career before it started.


Judd, Sciorra, and Hayek appear at the Oscars. Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

The speech they delivered didn't focus much on the actions of Weinstein specifically, but on the progress of a movement getting stronger every day.

"It’s nice to see you all again. It’s been a while," said Sciorra. "It’s an honor to be here tonight. This year, many spoke their truth and the journey ahead is long, but slowly a new path has emerged."

"The changes we are witnessing are being driven by the powerful sound of new voices, of different voices, of our voices — joining together in a mighty chorus that is finally saying time’s up," said Judd.

GIFs via The Hollywood Reporter/Twitter.

"We work together to make sure that the next 90 years empower these limitless possibilities of equality, diversity, inclusion, and intersectionality," Judd added before throwing to a montage of this year's cinematic trailblazers.

The Time's Up movement has been a huge success, raising $21 million in its first 60 days.

According to a new report from Deadline, more than 1,700 people from over 60 industries contacted the group in hopes of being able to utilize its legal defense fund for workplace harassment cases. The movement began at the beginning of 2018 as a way for Hollywood to use its influence to help victims of harassment find justice across industries.

Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino, who was also targeted by Weinstein, at the 90th Annual Academy Awards. Photo by Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images.

Watch Judd, Hayek, and Sciorra's powerful address below.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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