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This incredible speech shows why Harvey Weinstein was the biggest loser at the Oscars.

Judd, Hayek, and Sciorra delivered a must-watch speech for the Time's Up era.

This incredible speech shows why Harvey Weinstein was the biggest loser at the Oscars.

During the first Oscars of the #MeToo/Time's Up era, three of Harvey Weinstein's accusers took the stage to deliver a speech we all needed to hear.

About a day before the ceremony, it was announced that actresses Ashley Judd, Salma Hayek, and Annabella Sciorra would appear as presenters. The women had one thing in common: They'd all spoken out about being harassed or assaulted by Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.

As allegations against Weinstein rolled in, the three actresses each shared their stories of assault at the producer's hands. In December, The New York Times published Hayek's firsthand account of her experience with Weinstein. In October, Sciorra, best known for her Emmy-nominated role on "The Sopranos," opened up to The New Yorker about being raped and harassed by Weinstein. That same month, Judd spoke with ABC's Diane Sawyer, retelling her experience as a young actress sexually harassed by a man with the ability to destroy her career before it started.


Judd, Sciorra, and Hayek appear at the Oscars. Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

The speech they delivered didn't focus much on the actions of Weinstein specifically, but on the progress of a movement getting stronger every day.

"It’s nice to see you all again. It’s been a while," said Sciorra. "It’s an honor to be here tonight. This year, many spoke their truth and the journey ahead is long, but slowly a new path has emerged."

"The changes we are witnessing are being driven by the powerful sound of new voices, of different voices, of our voices — joining together in a mighty chorus that is finally saying time’s up," said Judd.

GIFs via The Hollywood Reporter/Twitter.

"We work together to make sure that the next 90 years empower these limitless possibilities of equality, diversity, inclusion, and intersectionality," Judd added before throwing to a montage of this year's cinematic trailblazers.

The Time's Up movement has been a huge success, raising $21 million in its first 60 days.

According to a new report from Deadline, more than 1,700 people from over 60 industries contacted the group in hopes of being able to utilize its legal defense fund for workplace harassment cases. The movement began at the beginning of 2018 as a way for Hollywood to use its influence to help victims of harassment find justice across industries.

Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino, who was also targeted by Weinstein, at the 90th Annual Academy Awards. Photo by Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images.

Watch Judd, Hayek, and Sciorra's powerful address below.

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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

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Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

Screenshots via @castrowas95/Twitter

In the Pacific Northwest, orca sightings are a fairly common occurrence. Still, tourists and locals alike marvel when a pod of "sea pandas" swim by, whipping out their phones to capture some of nature's most beautiful and intelligent creatures in their natural habitat.

While orcas aren't a threat to humans, there's a reason they're called "killer whales." To their prey, which includes just about everything that swims except humans, they are terrifying apex predators who hunt in packs and will even coordinate to attack whales several times their own size.

So if you're a human alone on a little platform boat, and a sea lion that a group of orcas was eyeing for lunch jumps onto your boat, you might feel a little wary. Especially when those orcas don't just swim on by, but surround you head-on.

Watch exactly that scenario play out (language warning, if you've got wee ones you don't want f-bombed):

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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

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Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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