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This Holiday Season, Skip Buying That Extra Gift And Help Some Newtown Families Instead

We often feel powerless, trapped all over the country, with no way to really help the victims of tragedy. However, the kind folks at Act MTV provided us with these six generous ways to help the Newtown community.Please consider making a donation. And then share this, so others can help as well.

This Holiday Season, Skip Buying That Extra Gift And Help Some Newtown Families Instead

Photo: (Getty)

The country is still feeling shock, sadness, anger, and disbelief after the school shooting that occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut last Friday. We have more ways you can help the victims and families involved.


If You Want To Donate To A National Organization

The United Way of Western Connecticut got right to action. Any donations made to the organizations's Sandy Hook School Support Fund right now will go to those affected and help them with their health as well as education costs and income stability. “We will stand with the community and everyone affected directly and indirectly by this tragic event as we face the days and weeks ahead," the organization said in a release.

If You Want To With Help Their Wellness

While the actual shooting is over, an incident of this caliber can leave many people feeling mental and emotional anguish, particularly those who witnessed what happened and those who lost loved ones. Newtown Youth and Family Services, a nonprofit mental health clinic, has opened its doors for families involved, students and school faculty, and also community members. If you make a donation now, it will go specifically to help the people affected by the shooting. They recommend that families and businesses donate to United Way's fund which we mentioned above but you can also mail donations to the offices to help with family and youth services:

Caroline's Gift
15 Berkshire Road
Sandy Hook CT 06482

If You Want To Show Support On FB

Since you’re going to be on Facebook anyway, why not use the opportunity to give emotional support? Shortly after the tragedy, the R.I.P. Sandy Hook Elementary School Children page launched on FB, and you can offer your sympathy and support. This way those hurting from the shooting will know they’re far from being alone. The group already has more than 200,000 likes.

If You Want To Send A Note Over The Internet

If you want to give personalized support off Facebook, please send a message by making an Evergram. With an Evergram you have the option to send a text, audio, or video greeting and it's easy to do. After a bunch of these personalized messages have been collected, they will be given to the Newtown community.

If You Want To Help With Funeral Costs

The fact of the matter is that funerals are expensive, and if families aren’t expecting funerals in their near future, as the families of Sandy Hook weren't, they might not have the money handy. So The Newtown Memorial Fund has stepped in to help with funeral bills. In addition to that, they want to make a community-wide memorial and a college scholarship fund.

If You Appreciate Musicians Who Give Back

It's great when celebs like musicians use their fame for a good cause. After hearing about the shooting, the guys of OneRepublic knew they could use their names to help, so they set up a Connecticut School Shooting Victims Fund. They've already surpassed their goal of $50,000, but that doesn't mean you can't still give. Funeral costs, medical costs, therapy costs... this stuff adds up, and OneRepublic knows the families have enough to deal with without worrying about money, too.

Photo courtesy of Macy's
True

Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

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Over the past six years, it feels like race relations have been on the decline in the U.S. We've lived through Donald Trump's appeals to America's racist underbelly. The nation has endured countless murders of unarmed Black people by police. We've also been bombarded with viral videos of people calling the police on people of color for simply going about their daily lives.

Earlier this year there was a series of incidents in which Asian-Americans were the targets of racist attacks inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Given all that we've seen in the past half-decade, it makes sense for many to believe that race relations in the U.S. are on the decline.

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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