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Capital One

When Cashia and Terrance Bryant first met, they knew they had something special. But Cashia was keeping something important from her man.

Photo courtesy of the Bryants.

The couple, who has now been married for two years, connected very quickly. After a short time together, they knew that their love was real, (even though they still argue about who said "I love you" first).


However, before they could take their relationship to the next level, Cashia had to come clean about something that had been worrying her since the start of their relationship — her bad credit.

“I didn't tell you for a long time because I was so scared you were gonna run," Cashia admits to Terrance.

Cashia's bad credit has been following her since she was 18-years-old.

Photo via Upworthy.

As a 42-year-old woman, Cashia knows how to build up and retain good credit. But when the family therapist was 18 years old, she had no idea what responsibility came with owning a credit card. She also racked up some considerable student loans.

Unfortunately, that has affected Cashia's credit up until this day.

And she's not only one with credit issues. Terrance's credit isn't where he'd like it to be either, and when he has money, a good portion of it goes to supporting his 17-year-old daughter, Ty'asia.

The couple's been making progress, though, because they have a major goal ahead of them. They want to own a house by next year.

Photo via Upworthy.

At first, this goal seemed completely insurmountable. How could two (now successful) people with low credit afford to own their own place?

In order to get to on the right path, Cashia and Terrance had to take a long look at their finances and make the decision to save rather than spend. It's easier said than done, and considering where they're at in their lives — with so many expenses that need to be taken care of right now — it sometimes felt like they were chasing an impossible dream.

While it took hard work and patience, the Bryants are now much closer to making their dream a reality.

Here's how they're doing it:

First, the couple dissected how much money they bring in versus how much goes out each month. Based on that information, Cashia created an aggressive budget for the pair — one that cuts down on spending while still allowing them to have a little fun as they save for a down payment.

As they get into the habit of saving, they're crafting a future in which making wise financial decisions comes easily and naturally to them.

Due to their lower credit scores, the Bryants may have to put more money down on the house they eventually choose, but thanks to their financial planning efforts, that's no longer an insurmountable task.

Ultimately, the process of buying a house is bringing the couple closer together. While the decisions that they've had to make have been difficult, sharing this mutual goal is like a recommitment to each other.

And all their planning and saving has made it possible for them to afford a down payment on a house next year. With that hurdle behind them, they can now pursue their greater goal beyond home ownership.

"We want our own family," says Cashia "I want our baby to experience a home."

"It took both of us," Terrance beams. "I'm glad we found each other."

To learn more about the Bryant's journey to homeownership, check out this video:

Photo from Dole
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