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This comic breaks down the problem with whitewashing race.

"Not seeing color just means defaulting to the regular standard, which is white."

This comic breaks down the problem with whitewashing race.

Sometimes people say they're "colorblind" — that they don't see race, and race doesn't matter to them.

While this might be well-intentioned, the idea of colorblindness is problematic. It often becomes a mechanism for ignoring systemic problems with racism, rather than addressing them. And instead of eliminating racism, colorblindness can "erase" the identities of people of color and minority groups.

Kerry Washington summed it up well in a discussion on colorblind racism:


"I'm not interested in, sort of, living in a world where my race is not a part of who I am. I am interested in living in a world where our races, no matter what they are, don't define our trajectory in life."

In this comic from Empathize This, the artist describes how it feels to be a minority and to be subjected to "colorblindness," or whitewashing:


Next time you hear someone say they're colorblind, share this comic with them.

When we acknowledge the beauty of racial diversity and address the problems surrounding race in our system, we create a world that is more inclusive for all people — and that's pretty important.

via Pixabay

As people get older, social isolation and loneliness become serious problems. Many find themselves living alone for the first time after the death of a spouse. It's also difficult for older people to maintain friendships when people they've known for years become ill or pass away.

Census Bureau figures say that almost a quarter of men and nearly 46% of women over the age of 75 live alone.

But loneliness doesn't just affect those who reside by themselves. People can feel lonely when there is a discrepancy between their desired and actual relationships. To put it simply, when it comes to having a healthy social life, quality is just as important as quantity.

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