This Animation Of Philip Seymour Hoffman Might Give You Chills. Then The Feels Will Rain Down.

"There is no pleasure that I haven't made myself sick on." — Philip Seymour Hoffman, Dec. 17, 2012 If you're feeling blue, this might be the right thing to listen to.


Philip Seymour Hoffman was a brilliant Academy-Award-winning actor.

The movie that some critics claim jump-started the actor's Hollywood career was "Capote," where Hoffman played the famous American writer Truman Capote. Hoffman won an Oscar for Best Actor for the part.

He died on Feb. 2, 2014.

For years, Hoffman had suffered from drug addictions. In 2013, he checked himself into rehab for drug abuse, including heroin, alcohol, and prescription drugs.


Unfortunately, despite the treatment, he overdosed on a mixture of drugs. His death sent shock waves across the Internet and media.

A few months later, PBS turned one of Hoffman's old interviews into a cartoon.

The original conversation with English philosopher Simon Critchley at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City was recorded live on Dec. 17, 2012. The topic? Quite simply, happiness.

It is a little hard not to feel a bit haunted by how eerie this animation is.

Seriously. He talks about happiness, life, and dying — and then, over a year later, his death was marked by the tragedy and sadness of drug abuse.

In the end, it's moving. Really, it is. It gets a little dark at times, but it's beautiful. Especially when he talks about his kids at 1:08.

OK, now I'm tearing up a little. Without much ado, take a look at PBS's animated version of Hoffman's words on happiness.

And if you're a really, really huge fan of Hoffman (or Critchley!), you can see the original, full conversation below.

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Photo by Raul Varzar on Unsplash

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