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This adorable cartoon explains privilege in the most nonconfrontational way possible

We can learn a lot from a snail and a caterpillar. We might even make the world a cooler place while we're at it.

This adorable cartoon explains privilege in the most nonconfrontational way possible
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I have no idea what it's like to be a snail. Or a caterpillar. Or *you*.

And you have no idea what it's like to be me.

Funny how that works, huh?


Do you have struggles?

I definitely do. We all do, in one way or another. Big, petty, annoying, unfair — the struggles in life *are* real.

You could be:

gay

transgender

living with a disability

a different religion

a different race

wealthy

not wealthy

a snail (?)

[insert fact about your life here]

The bottom line: You are you. Not someone else.

It can be hard to see a different perspective or understand what someone else's life is like because you walk in your shoes — not theirs. And because of that, it makes it that much easier to assume you know what's going on with them.

But if you take time to listen and learn...


And imagine what it's like to be in their position...

It'll help you understand your privilege, and it'll show others some serious respect. I'm working on it myself, and I'm pretty sure if we all try it, we'll be way more accepting and the best humans we can be.

What's not to like about that?

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One little girl took pictures of her school lunches. The Internet responded — and so did the school.

If you listened to traditional news media (and sometimes social media), you'd begin to think the Internet and technology are bad for kids. Or kids are bad for technology. Here's a fascinating alternative idea.

True
Norton

This article originally appeared on 03.31.15

Kids can innovate, create, and imagine in ways that are fresh and inspiring — when we "allow" them to do so, anyway. Despite the tendency for parents to freak out because their kids are spending more and more time with technology in schools, and the tendency for schools themselves to set extremely restrictive limits on the usage of such technology, there's a solid argument for letting them be free to imagine and then make it happen.

It's not a stretch to say the kids in this video are on the cutting edge. Some of the results he talks about in the video at the bottom are quite impressive.

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