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They Said No Kids Allowed. Watch This Girl’s Awe-Inspiring Response.

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They Said No Kids Allowed. Watch This Girl’s Awe-Inspiring Response.

Did you know that up until 25 years ago, international law held that children were not considered human beings but merely objects one could care for? Really.


Why is it the case that international law had paradoxically little recognition for the rights of a group who are, by definition, the next generation of people who deserve rights, you ask? Beats me. Maybe they viewed children as needy, fragile, and frequently wet balls of helplessness.

And in so doing, they forgot that they were once needy, fragile, frequently wet balls of helplessness. Hell, some still are.

Nonetheless, many came to their senses in 1989, when the United Nations ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the first such treaty to recognize human rights for children.

If there's any lingering doubt that children need rights, support, and recognition, see the video UNICEF produced to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. As this awe-inspiring girl from South Africa shows, with the right tools, kids can accomplish incredible feats.

SOURCE: iSTOCK

Usually the greatest fear after a wild night of partying isn't what you said that you might regret, but how you'll look in your friends' tagged photos. Although you left the house looking like a 10, those awkward group selfies make you feel more like a 5, prompting you to wonder, "Why do I look different in pictures?"

It's a weird phenomenon that, thanks to selfies, is making people question their own mirrors. Are pictures the "real" you or is it your reflection? Have mirrors been lying to us this whole time??

The answer to that is a bit tricky. The good news is that there's a big chance that Quasimodo-looking creature that stares back at you in your selfies isn't an accurate depiction of the real you. But your mirror isn't completely truthful either.

Below, a scientific breakdown that might explain those embarrassing tagged photos of you:

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