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They Denied Her Humanity, So She Got Famous And Spoke Out. Loud.

I've always been pretty down with love. It's a really nice feeling, and it inspired a lot of pretty good Beatles songs. But somehow, it never really occurred to me that love can be a tool for revolutionary social change — change that's been a long time coming. Turns out, sometimes you need Laverne Cox to really break it down for you.There are so, so many truly great parts of this. There's 3:32, when she explains why we all have the capacity to both hurt and love, and 8:17, when she reminds us that our society treats some people like criminals simply for existing. The real highlight, however, is at 5:20, when she tells the story of the brilliant student she met on Spirit Day in Charleston, S.C. Do. Not. Miss. That.

via Dov Forman / Twitter

In 1945, Lily Ebert, now 90, was liberated from a German munitions factory where she worked as slave labor after being transferred from the Auschwitz death camp.

A few weeks after being liberated, an American soldier shared some words of positivity with her, "The start to a new life. Good luck and happiness," he wrote on a German banknote.

The simple gesture was life-changing for Ebert and the banknote became one of her most treasured keepsakes.

"This soldier was the first human being who was kind to us," she told NBC News. "It was the first time after this terrible life that somebody was kind and I knew that somebody wants to help."

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