These parents had a selfless response after their daughter's groom canceled the wedding.

What would you do if your daughter's fiancé called off a $35,000 wedding at the very last minute?

(...and deposits have already been paid, and more bills are on the way...?)


Photo via iStock.

There are infinite conclusions to that unfortunate and expensive scenario, and plenty of them don't end well for anyone involved.

But as KCRA News reports, if you're like the Duane family from California, you take the high road.

When the Duanes found out their daughter's wedding was canceled because the groom got cold feet, they decided to turn lemons into lemonade.

All GIFs via KCRA News.

Instead of just getting mad — and honestly, who could blame them? — the bride's parents still threw the reception. And they invited Sacramento's homeless population to partake.

There was plenty of food for those from a local shelter, as the city's Citizen Hotel (where the reception had been scheduled to take place) had prepared to feed about 120 wedding guests.

The Duanes didn't skimp on the menu, either — those who dropped in for a warm meal filled their plates with salmon, tri-tip beef, and gnocchi, among other (delicious) things.

“I feel a lot of heartache and heartbreak" for my daughter, said Kari Duane, the would-be-bride's mother. "But I will take away something really good from this."

With more than 2,600 homeless people around town (Sacramento has been struggling to curb homelessness in recent years, as The Sacramento Bee reported in July), there was no shortage of folks to appreciate the Duanes' kind gesture.

The feast was more than just a meal for those who made it out.

“When you're going through a hard time and a struggle, for you to get out and do something different — and with your family — is really a blessing," Rashad Abdullah, a homeless man, explained to KCRA.

Erika Craycraft, another homeless guest who enjoyed the meal, thought the Duanes' decision to give away food was especially thoughtful, given the circumstances.

Check out KCRA News' coverage of the story below:

Aging is a weird thing. We all do it—we truly have no choice in the matter. It's literally how time and living things work.

But boy, do we make the process all kinds of complicated. The anti-aging market has created a 58.5 billion-dollar industry, with human beings spending their whole lives getting older spending buttloads of money to pretend like it's not happening.

I'm one of those human beings, by the way, so no judgment here. When I find a product that makes me look as young as I feel inside, I get pretty giddy.

But there's no doubt that our views on aging—and by extension, our perspectives on our own aging bodies—are influenced by popular culture. As we see celebrities in the spotlight who seem to be ageless, we enviously tag them with the hashtag #aginggoals. The goal is to "age well," which ultimately means looking like we're not aging at all. And so we break out the creams and the serums and the microdermabrasion and the injections—even the scalpel, in some cases—to keep the wrinkles, crinkles, bags, and sags at bay.

There's a big, blurry line between having a healthy skincare routine and demonizing normal signs of aging, and we each decide where our own line gets drawn.

This is where Justine Bateman comes in.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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