These Hollywood stars want you to help them 'Save the Day' this November.

Joss Whedon assembled (most of) the Avengers — plus other super-famous people who sometimes play super-people — for a very important message about the upcoming election.

Yet another celebrity video on why you should vote. Only this time they're adding even more famous people because voting is kinda really super important. (via YouTube/SaveTheDay.Vote & storyful)

Posted by Upworthy on Thursday, September 22, 2016

They need our help to save the day, and there's one thing each of us can do on Nov. 8, 2016, to make that happen: Vote.


Starring the likes of Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, Scarlett Johansson, Neil Patrick Harris, Jesse Williams, and many, many more, the video serves as a powerful reminder that we — regular people — hold the power to change the world for the better.

GIFs from Save the Day/Facebook

Whether you're a high-profile movie star, an accountant, a police officer, or a sales clerk, we all get one vote; and those votes all matter, especially in this election.

Polls show a teeth-grindingly tight race between two candidates with vastly different world-views this year. This one is going to come down to the wire, and you (yes, you) absolutely matter in helping to determine not just the future of the U.S., but a broader impact on the world.

Just 57.5% of eligible voters cast a ballot in the 2012 presidential election. That's more than 100 million people who stayed home.

The election was determined by fewer than five million votes. Had just a fraction of those eligible voters made their way out to their polling place, they could have tipped the election.

Regardless which candidate you feel best represents your interests, it's important that you (yes, you) vote. A democracy works best when all are informed participants.

One thing is clear: Both sides are not the same. That's not to say one side is better than another, but they are different in key ways. Apathy is not an option.

Because this isn't about any one individual. This is about you, your family, your community, your country, and your world. This is about shaping the future of humanity.

And while you may not have the superpowers of the Hulk, the riches of Iron Man, or the special abilities of other characters of the Marvel universe, you have something even more powerful: your vote. You can save the day.

Go to savetheday.vote to get registered today.

via Pexels and @drjoekort / TikTok

Gay sex and relationships therapist Dr. Joe Kort is causing a stir on TikTok where he explains why straight men who have sex with men can still be considered straight. If a man has sex with a man doesn't it ultimately make him gay or bisexual?

According to Kort, there can be a big chasm between our sexual and romantic orientations.

"Straight men can be attracted to the sex act, but not to the man. Straight men having sex with men doesn't cancel somebody's heterosexuality any more than a straight woman having sex with a woman cancels her [heterosexuality]," he says in the video.

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"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

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Controversy has been brewing for months at the University of Texas at Austin as student-athletes petitioned the school to stop playing the school's alma mater song, "The Eyes of Texas."

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This summer, in the midst of nationwide protests against racial injustice, students at the university launched a petition asking the school to confront its historic ties with the Confederacy in the names of buildings on campus and to formally acknowledge the racial roots of the alma mater song. A second student petition asked the school to replace the song with one that didn't have "racist undertones" in an attempt "to make Texas more comfortable and inclusive for the black athletes and the black community that has so fervently supported this program."

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