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These before and after photos show what happens when you put an end to dogfighting.

Come on, folks. We can do better than this.Heads-up: If you don't want to view the graphic images of injured dogs at the moment, just avoid hitting "play" on the video and read the rest.

What do these three dogs have in common?

They all used to be involved in dogfighting.


What exactly is dogfighting?

It's a "sport" where dog owners force their dogs to fight each other, usually for money. According to the ASPCA:

"Major dogfight raids have resulted in seizures of more than $500,000, and it is not unusual for $20,000-$30,000 to change hands in a single fight."

Wait until you hear about what happens to the dogs.

They sustain horrible injuries, most of which are never treated. As a result, many dogfighting dogs die. Those that don't often live in terrible conditions, chained down to the ground in a circle of dirt or a dirty doghouse.

Fortunately for many dogs, there are people out there who fight to rescue them, crack down on dogfighting rings, and round up the abusers.

Ever, Blue, and Haddukken were all saved by such people. The fact that they now have loving owners who care for them — and who they love — shows that dogs *can* overcome this type of abuse. And the best part?

You can help save them. Here's how:

  1. If you see something, say something.

    Report animal cruelty wherever you see it. Call your local police or animal control agency, as well as any of the multiple animal shelters or rescues in your neighborhood. The ASPCA also has an AWESOME list with tips on what else you should know and do when you report animal cruelty.

  2. Know your state. Know your laws.
    While dogfighting is a felony from Alabama to Wyoming, animal cruelty laws still differ from state to state. Make sure your state isn't letting animal abusers off the hook.
  3. Adopt a pit bull.
    If there's any breed that is disproportionately targeted for dogfighting, it's the pit bull. Because of this, many people think that pit bulls are inherently more violent than other breeds, and that is why they overwhelmingly fill up animal shelters. But that's not true. The truth is that the pit bulls in dogfighting are only bred to be this way. They're as warm and friendly as any other breed can be, and many of them need a home.

April 8 is National Dog Fighting Awareness Day. Spread the word today (and every day) to help make a safer world for our furry friends.

You can watch the video below to learn more — heads-up, there are graphic images.

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