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If you ask men in Egypt what their mom's name is, you'll get some responses like this:

That's because for some men in Egypt and in other Middle Eastern countries, it's socially not OK to speak your mother's name in public.


Why? The taboo on saying your mother's name, according to the U.N., is in order to prevent her name from becoming the subject of shame and ridicule, which could bring embarassment to a family.

So instead of her name, a mom is often referred to as "the mother of her eldest son."

In some cases, her real name is actually forgotten over time.

Forgotten! Just like that.

It's a tradition that's been accepted for so long, many people don't question it. But that's changing now.

These men love their moms, and they want to protect their families. But what if a mom losing her name actually hurts her? Why should shame be attached to her name in the first place?

Through a Mother's Day campaign called Give Mom Back Her Name, Egyptians are trying to break the stigma and show appreciation for the women who brought them into the world.

These Egyptians started the hashtag #MyMothersNameIs with hopes that people will come forward and show support. People are even changing their profile pictures to include their mom's name in them.

These men know that their moms are incredible human beings who deserve recognition.

That's why they're speaking up and saying their mom's names out loud:

It takes strength to confront a cultural tradition. Those who have stepped forward are brave, and they're taking a step toward equality.

Hopefully it'll catch on.

P.S. Shoutout to my mom, Laura. Hi, mom!

via Lady A / Twitter and Whittlz / Flickr

In one of the most glaringly hypocritical moves in recent history, the band formerly known as Lady Antebellum is suing black blues singer Anita "Lady A" White, to use her stage name she's performed under for over three decades.

Lady Antebellum announced it had changed its name to Lady A on June 11 as part of its commitment to "examining our individual and collective impact and marking the necessary changes to practice antiracism."

Antebellum refers to an era in the American south before the civil war when black people were held as slaves.

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