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The Way Doctors Think About Death Is Pretty Different From The Way Their Patients Do

When it comes to death, I guess they're the experts. Here's what the experts have to say on the topic.

The Way Doctors Think About Death Is Pretty Different From The Way Their Patients Do
Photo courtesy of Capital One
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Growing up in Virginia, Dominique Meeks Gombe idolized her family physician — a young Black woman who inspired Meeks Gombe to pursue her passion for chemistry.

While Meeks Gombe began her career working in an environmental chemistry lab, after observing multiple inefficient processes in and around the lab, she took the initiative to teach herself to code in order to automate and streamline those issues.

That sparked her love for coding and imminent career shift. Now a software engineer at Capital One, Meeks Gombe wants to be a similar role model to her childhood mentor and encourage girls to pursue any career they desire.

"I'm so passionate about technology because that's where the world is going," Meeks Gombe said. "All of today's problems will be solved using technology. So it's very important for me, as a Black woman, to be at the proverbial table with my unique perspective."

Since 2019, she and her fellow Capital One associates have partnered with the Capital One Coders program and Girls For A Change to teach coding fundamentals to middle school girls.

The nonprofit's mission is aimed at empowering Black girls in Central Virginia. The organization focuses on designing, leading, funding and implementing social change projects that tackle issues girls face in their own neighborhoods.

Girls For a Change is one of many local nonprofits that receive support from the Capital One Impact Initiative, which strives to close gaps in equity while helping people gain better access to economic and social opportunities. The initial $200 million, five-year national commitment aims to support growth in underserved communities as well as advance socioeconomic mobility.

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Courtesy of Movemeant Foundation

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Have you ever woken up one day and wondered if you were destined to do more in your life? Or worried you didn't take that shot at your dream?

FOX's new show "The Big Leap." is here to show you that all you need to take that second chance is the confidence to do so.

Watch as a group of diverse underdogs from all different walks of life try to change their lives by auditioning for a reality TV dance show, finding themselves on an emotional journey when suddenly thrust into the spotlight. And they're not letting the fact that they don't have the traditional dancer body type, age, or background hold them back.

Unfortunately, far too many people lack this kind of confidence. That's why FOX is partnering with the Movemeant Foundation, an organization whose whole mission is to teach women and girls that fitness and physical movement is essential to helping them develop self-confidence, resilience, and commitment with communities of like-minded girls.

For example, every year the foundation hosts a number of "We Dare to Bare" events to celebrate women of all shapes and sizes doing boxing, hip hop, yoga, and other boot camps — all just wearing their sports bras. They also have a BIPOC fitness grant program to empower women, businesses, and organizations that are leading the way in making wellness and fitness more inclusive.

When you feel good in your body, you're going to feel much more confident in all aspects of your life, and that will empower you to take a big leap, whether that's leaving your job to start a passion project, learning to dance, or getting on a flying trapeze at the age of 41.

If you want to support others in this mission — or go after it yourself — join FOX in supporting the Movemeant Foundation by donating or applying for one of their grants.

And don't forget to tune in to the series premiere of "The Big Leap" on Monday, September 20 at 9/8c on FOX.