True
Modern Love

When Ellie was 3 years old, she began wearing dresses.

At first, her parents assumed they simply had a son who liked playing with different clothing — "and we were OK with that," noted Ellie's mom.

But that wasn't the whole story.


As time passed, it became more evident that Ellie didn't associate with the sex she was assigned at birth. She's a girl.

In the video below, Ellie's mom and dad read a touching letter addressed to their daughter's teachers and classmates' parents, explaining why they support their child, through and though.

“Ellie has told us she’s a girl in many ways," the letter says. "The most clear has been, ‘I’m a girl in my heart and my brain.’”

The letter is a true testament to the courage it takes to be yourself and the special power of unconditional love:

Ellie and her family's story is a reminder that so much more needs to be done to ensure equality for all LGBTQ Americans.

While the U.S. has moved forward on issues like marriage equality and same-sex adoption, progress has also been met with fervent opposition. Much of the backlash has focused on the transgender community, which still faces obstacles in housing and employment discrimination (and, sadly, even just using the bathroom).

Ellie's parents, however, are confident their brave 5-year-old will lead a happy and fulfilling life. And they're committed to supporting her each step of the way.

“I’m really scared for her," Ellie's dad admits, holding back tears. "But at the same time, I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

It is safe to say that the wise words of Muhammad Ali stands the test of time. Widely considered to be the greatest heavyweight boxer the world has ever seen, the legacy of Ali extends far beyond his pugilistic endeavors. Throughout his career, he spoke out about racial issues and injustices. The brash Mohammed Ali (or who we once knew as Cassius Clay) was always on point with his charismatic rhetoric— despite being considered arrogant at times. Even so, he had a perspective that was difficult to argue with.

As a massive boxing fan—and a huge Ali fan—I have never seen him more calm and to the point then in this recently posted BBC video from 1971. Although Ali died in 2016, at 74 years old, his courage inside and outside the ring is legendary. In this excerpt, Ali explained to Michael Parkinson about how he used to ask his mother about white representation. Even though the interview is nearly 50 years old, it shows exactly how far we need to come as a country on the issues of racial inclusion and equality.


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