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The Last 4 Words She Says To Stephen Colbert Are Everything. They Cut Through All The BS.

When she started pointing out sexism in video games, she got bombarded with rape threats and death threats. But here she is on "Colbert," telling it like it is and giving not a single you-know-what.

So yeah, video games should try and include all sorts of people. Totally reasonable right? And yet, not only has she been threatened with rape and murder for saying such reasonable things, she's been driven out of her house and forced to cancel a talk in Utah because someone threatened a massacre and the police couldn't prevent people from bringing guns into the building where she was speaking because of the state's open carry laws. What's been happening to her is basically the worst. And yet, here she is on "The Colbert Report." That's way more than can be said for any of her haters.

If you agree that women should be able to talk about video games without getting harassed and having their lives threatened, you might want to share this.


IMPORTANT NOTE FOR CANADIANS ONLY: You folks up north can watch the full episode featuring this interview here.

Peg Hunter/Flickr/cc

This article originally appeared on Common Dreams. You can read it here.

A U.S. district court on Monday delivered a major win to local Indigenous organizers and climate activists—and a significant blow to the fossil fuel industry and the Trump administration—by ordering the Dakota Access Pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil by Aug. 5 while federal regulators conduct an environmental review of the project.

DAPL, as the Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) pipeline is widely known, transports crude oil from North Dakota's Bakken shale basin to a terminal in Illinois. The pipeline has gained international notoriety in recent years due to protests—particularly on and around the Standing Rock Indian Reservation—by environmentalists and Native Americans who live along the route.

The Monday decision by D.C.-based District Judge James E. Boasberg comes after four years of litigation brought by the Standing Rock Sioux, Cheyenne River Sioux, and others against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for allowing ETP to construct and operate the pipeline beneath Lake Oahe, a dammed portion of the Missouri River near the reservation.

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