+

Imagine being transported to a time when the world was ruled by dinosaurs. Toy dinosaurs, that is.

RAWRRR! Photo by Tricia Arnold/Flickr


This is the world created on the prehistoric channel, an increasingly popular YouTube account run by an unidentified young boy who loves, loves, loves dinosaurs.

For months, he might as well have been any anonymous YouTube user, uploading a couple videos a week to share with a small handful of subscribers — most of whom were probably friends and family.

Videos of what, exactly? Take a look...

It all started with his very first live action production, called "the lost amazon," which features a toy safari car trekking over well-worn living room carpet, past vegetation that looks suspiciously like potpourri, and finally coming upon a miraculous grouping of (toy) dinosaurs, just as the music crescendos.

This safari car just stumbled across something incredible. All images from the prehistoric channel

In later videos, he animates fictional fights between different ancient beasts, like the one depicted in "oviraptor vs iguanodon," or stages elaborate set pieces for a recurring series he calls "prehistory island."


GIF via "oviraptor vs iguanodon."

He even reviews dinosaur toys for both scientific accuracy and ease-of-use, and wow does he know an impressive amount about dinosaur toys, models, and collectibles.

Skeptics might even think his videos are some kind of viral marketing stunt for Schleich, who manufactures a lot of these toys, but we doubt it.

It's all narrated excitedly over the buzz of a busy household in the background. Sometimes his mom talks to him while he's filming. Other times he fumbles with the camera, the way a kid his age would.

But most of the time he's just totally lost in his imagination.

The world first learned about the prehistoric channel when someone posted one of his videos to reddit. In just a few days, the channel gained nearly 90,000 followers.

Hello there!

The reaction to this little boy and his dinosaur videos has been about one of the most genuine things you'll ever see online.

Once reddit showed his work to the world, the response was ... amazing. Comments poured in for his videos. "I love what you're doing," and "Do what you love man, keep going!"

Some people even popped in to ask the kid a couple of questions about the dinosaurs featured in his movies.

And the boy's reaction to his newfound fame? Let's just say he was pretty happy about it.

He reminds me so much of myself as a kid.

I'd lose myself for hours in elaborate storylines I made up with my toys, including battles, races, epic rescues, and dialogue for multiple characters. The only difference is this kid put it all on the Internet for everyone to see.

People aren't tuning in to learn about dinosaurs or for the production value. We're tuning in because he reminds us of a time when our imagination was the only thing we needed in the whole world. And if there's anything that deserves to be shared on the Internet, that's it.

You can check out his full channel here. It will definitely be one of the best things you do today.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less
Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


Keep ReadingShow less

She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

Keep ReadingShow less