The delightful, charitable reason the internet's clamoring to get a date with Idris Elba.

Actor Idris Elba doesn't have a date for Valentine's Day.

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Turner.

And to every man, woman, and child on Earth, this should be a travesty.


If Elba isn't a catch, nobody is a catch.

His resume is stacked with interesting, important, boundary-pushing work, like when he shined in HBO's "The Wire," brought tears to eyes in "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom," or snagged a Golden Globe for his role in the BBC's "Luther."

He's also a writer, musician, possible future James Bond, and just generally really cool dude who's stood up for diversity in the entertainment industry on more than one occasion. (Plus, let's get real — he's not exactly hard on the eyes either.)

He is the catchiest of catches.

This is why Elba needs a valentine this year. And the best part is, that person could be you.

No, this is not a drill.

Let him explain:

Be Idris Elba's Valentine

This year, I want YOU to be my Valentine. We’ll have a romantic candle-lit meal, maybe some champagne, and see where the meal takes us. It’s for a good cause, so will you be mine? If yes, GO: http://bit.ly/BeMine-Valentine

Posted by Idris Elba on Tuesday, January 10, 2017

If you enter and win Elba's new Omaze campaign, you (and a friend) will get flown out to have a delicious dinner with Elba and stay in a four-star hotel.

"That’s right, love," Elba says in the video. "Just you and me. No one else around. Just us."

Elba isn't the only catch involved, by the way — the contest has one too. It's one, however, that'll make your romantic dinner even more worth it.

Every entry to the contest requires a donation toward W.E. Can Lead, an organization helping connect girls in Sierra Leone with educational and leadership opportunities.

The nonprofit has Girls Empowerment Clubs, for instance, that teach young women anything from financial literacy to positive self-esteem practices. W.E. Can Lead's Young Leaders Development Program focuses on making girls' professional goals a reality, connecting them with higher education opportunities or assisting them in starting their own business.  

"I grew up with a sense that anything and everything is possible!" says the group's founder, Isha Sesay. "Quite simply, I believed I could lead. I want to foster that same confidence in other young girls."

Sesay speaks at an event in New York City in 2014. Photo by Thos Robinson/Getty Images for The African-American Institute.

These programs can make a world of difference in Sierra Leone, a country with deep-rooted gender inequities where women generally lack access to decision-making power and control over resources, according to USAID.

To call this contest a win-win may just be the understatement of the year.

Even if you (tragically) fail to win Elba for a romantic dinner, your donation will help create a better world for girls and women in one of the countries where it's needed most.

That definitely beats spending your money on a box of chocolates, right?

GIF via Idris Elba/Facebook.

To learn more about the contest and enter to win, visit the campaign on Omaze.

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