Most Shared

The awesome way one school is helping students broadcast messages to the world.

They're reaching their community on a level above and beyond social media.

True
XQ

After the tragedy of Michael Brown, kids everywhere were eager to have their opinions on the subject heard.

This was especially true in Missouri.

Student protest in Ferguson, Missouri. Image via XQ.


In the months following the shooting, there were numerous student protests over racial bias and discrimination. Young people were angry, and they wanted change — both in their hometowns and on the national level.

A Ferguson protest at Stanford University. Photo by Paul George/Flickr.

Today, the protests and fights for justice are ongoing because the problems are far from over. Many people turn to social media to keep the many conversations around these issues relevant, but that can sometimes feel like screaming into a void of millions of other voices.

The students of Ritenour High School had a special way to get their voices heard over the crowd though: a professional media lab.

Image via XQ.

The lab at the school near St. Louis, Missouri, is outfitted with all the tools the kids need to create fully produced radio shows and television broadcasts about the issues they care about and the news stories that affect them.

"Our school has been very forward-thinking with journalism," explains Jane Bannester, a teacher at Ritenour. "It wasn't just 'I'm doing an assignment and I'm turning it in.' It's 'I'm doing it, and there are people in our community who are hearing this and looking to us to tell these different stories.'"

The students genuinely feel like they're making a difference in speaking to their community at large.

It's also giving them the skills they need to work in media professionally.

The lab allows the students to get hands-on experience producing their own media programs so they can have a sense of how it's done in the real world. This type of training is vital for kids who want to pursue careers in the fast-paced world of journalism and broadcast news.

A student watches a television broadcast taping. Image via XQ.

Anyone can post their opinions on social media outlets, but it takes serious training and skill to get those opinions to reach a major audience. Ritenour's media program is giving its students the means to do just that in a way that counts.

It's no surprise that Rintenour is on its way to becoming an XQ Super School. XQ is helping schools nationwide adapt to an ever-advancing world. Their high-tech classroom is what people running the project hope all classrooms across the country will eventually look like — one that's filled with tools that will better prepare them to take on any career in media they choose.

Today, it seems like there's never not a "breaking news" moment. Thanks to this awesome media lab setup, you know these students will be covering them.

The Ritenour students may just be kids, but their interactive lab classroom has allowed them to be heard on a level that rivals local news stations.

In the not-too-distant future, the skills they're picking up in this classroom will help them rise up in the competitive media business, but right now, it's helping them realize their voices matter and deserve to be amplified.

Learn more at XQSuperSchool.org.

Check out their whole story here:

These students are telling stories that need to be told, and their community is listening.

Posted by Upworthy on Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Let's Do More Together

A Boston couple moved into a new place the week of lockdown. Here’s how they kept their sanity.

The new litmus test for domestic partnerships? A pandemic.

For medical workers in a pandemic, protecting loved ones can be tricky.

To support this effort and other programs like it, all you have to do is keep doing what you're doing — like shopping for laundry detergent. Turn your everyday actions into acts of good every day at P&G Good Everyday.

True

When Jonathan Irons was 16, he was put on trial for burglary and assault with a weapon. According to CBS Sports, Irons was tried as adult, and an all-white jury found him guilty—despite there being no witnesses, no fingerprints, no footprints, and no DNA proving his guilt.

Irons began his 50-year sentence in a Missouri state prison in 1998. Now, 22 years later, he's a free man, largely thanks to the tireless efforts of a WNBA superstar.

Maya Moore is arguably the most decorated professional women's basketball player in the U.S. A first-round draft pick in 2011, she's played for the Minnesota Lynx, where she became a six-time WNBA All-Star, a five-time All-WNBA First Team player, a four-time WNBA champion, and the WNBA Most Valuable Player in 2014.

But before the 2019 season, in the peak of her career, Moore decided to take the year off for a different kind of court battle—one that had wrongfully convicted a young man and doomed him to spend most of his life behind bars. Her decision rocked her sport, and there was no guarantee that sacrificing an entire season to fight for criminal justice reform would bear any fruit.

Keep Reading Show less