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Stephen Fry Somehow Makes Sense Of Racism

It takes a clear head to drill into the bedrock of history, especially when that history contains some pretty atrocious acts. Lucky for us, Stephen Fry is up to the task.

Stephen Fry Somehow Makes Sense Of Racism

We rarely think of comedians as experts.


But there's one topic they know better than almost anyone else.

Stephen Fry is a great comedian. And the way he sees it, language is the key to understanding racism. Which in turn, is the key to understanding genocide.


Because all genocides in recent history have had one thing in common:

From the minute the Nazis came to power, they knew ordinary Germans would have a much harder time getting on board with the wholesale slaughter of Jews and Roma and other "undesirable" groups if they thought of them as fellow people. So they started referring to them as...


And...

And...

You see the same pattern in Rwanda in the '90s. And elsewhere. Time and time again, one of the first steps taken by the leaders of genocidal movements is to control the way certain groups of people are discussed. Because when you think of someone as less than human, it becomes much easier to treat them in unspeakably cruel ways.

Martin Luther King Jr. said it best:


Which is why it's so important to protect the free flow of language and ideas.

The whole speech is completely fascinating. I highly recommend taking a look:

SOURCE: iSTOCK

Usually the greatest fear after a wild night of partying isn't what you said that you might regret, but how you'll look in your friends' tagged photos. Although you left the house looking like a 10, those awkward group selfies make you feel more like a 5, prompting you to wonder, "Why do I look different in pictures?"

It's a weird phenomenon that, thanks to selfies, is making people question their own mirrors. Are pictures the "real" you or is it your reflection? Have mirrors been lying to us this whole time??

The answer to that is a bit tricky. The good news is that there's a big chance that Quasimodo-looking creature that stares back at you in your selfies isn't an accurate depiction of the real you. But your mirror isn't completely truthful either.

Below, a scientific breakdown that might explain those embarrassing tagged photos of you:

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