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Some Men And Women Aren't Getting The Pap Smears And Prostate Exams They Need For One Dumb Reason

So what we have is a small demographic of women who aren't getting what millions of other women can safely expect from their providers. And the same goes for another small demographic of men. Why? This flowchart will give you the scoop.

Some Men And Women Aren't Getting The Pap Smears And Prostate Exams They Need For One Dumb Reason

OK, before you get confused, here's some basic lingo: A transgender woman is a person who identifies as a woman but was born with male anatomy. A transgender man identifies as a man but was born with female anatomy.

But let's get this straight: Transgender women are women. Transgender men are men. How their bodies look doesn't matter.


Now that we've got that down, here's the flowchart for ya.

FACT CHECK TIME!

Our fact-checkers found that all the statements in this handy-dandy infographic check out. Here are more specific statistics to give some context:

  • 15 percent of transgender people are living in poverty — compared to 4 percent of the general population. Plus, 19 percent of people who are trans don't have health care coverage. Medicaid is health coverage for low-income people, so the trans population could really benefit from it.
  • Gender dysphoria, which the graphic describes, is really hard for trans people. Some of them take hormones to help fight it. But hormone use without supervision can lead to liver problems, blood clots, strokes, and other risks. If trans people could have access to a provider who could supervise their hormone use, they could avoid those risks.
  • Yep, we can provide health care to transgender people without raising costs.
  • It sounds strange, but it's true: Many services that non-transgender people have access to are denied to clients who are trans. This include Pap smears, mammograms, and prostate exams, among many others. Trans men generally still have an anatomy that includes a uterus, a cervix, and ovaries (and sometimes breasts). Trans women generally still have an anatomy that includes a prostate. But if trans men legally change their gender to "male," they don't qualify for Pap smears and mammograms. Trans women who legally change their gender to "female" don't qualify for prostate exams. Non-transgender people would never have to go through this hurdle. Messed up, isn't it?

  • 78 percent of trans people report that after treatment for gender dysphoria, they feel psychologically better. The suicide rates also drop dramatically after treatment, from 19%-29% to 0.8%-6%.

So far, a few states have begun to require Medicaid to provide trans people with health coverage. But there are still many, many states where trans people don't have basic health rights under the law.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

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Having lived in small towns and large cities in the Pacific Northwest, Southwest, and Midwest, and after spending a year traveling around the U.S. with my family, I've seen first-hand that Americans have much more in common than not. I've also gotten to experience some of the cultural differences, subtle and not-so-subtle, real and not-so-real, that exist in various parts of the country.

Some of those differences are being discussed in a viral thread on Twitter. Self-described "West coaster" Jordan Green kicked it off with an observation about East coasters being kind and West coasters being nice, which then prompted people to share their own social experiences in various regions around the country.

Green wrote:

"When I describe East Coast vs West Coast culture to my friends I often say 'The East Coast is kind but not nice, the West Coast is nice but not kind,' and East Coasters immediately get it. West Coasters get mad.

Niceness is saying 'I'm so sorry you're cold,' while kindness may be 'Ugh, you've said that five times, here's a sweater!' Kindness is addressing the need, regardless of tone.

I'm a West Coaster through and through—born and raised in San Francisco, moved to Portland for college, and now live in Seattle. We're nice, but we're not kind. We'll listen to your rant politely, smile, and then never speak to you again. We hit mute in real life. ALOT.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.