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She's made so many doctors furious — but she's not backing down.

Dr. Leana Wen is just what I would hope for in a doctor of my own: She's honest. But it's exactly that honesty that's been getting her into so much trouble lately.

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Wen has known that she wanted to be a doctor since she was little. So that's just what she's done — gone to medical school, gotten her degree, and become a doctor. But now, Wen (still a doctor) finds herself in the midst of quite a bit of controversy. Find out what happened below.

As a result of her experiences as a doctor, including watching her mother battle cancer, Wen advocates for full transparency in medicine. She wants doctors to disclose their education, how they're paid, and any conflicts of interest they might have. And for this, she's gotten quite a huge amount of backlash from other doctors. But Wen will not back down.


Do you think doctors should be required to be so transparent with their patients? Check out Wen's website, Who's My Doctor? to see what it's all about. And if you agree with her, consider sharing this video with your friends (and doctors).

via LeapsMag / Instagram

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