In 2014, Nicki Minaj released a super-controversial music video for her song "Anaconda."


These are probably the most G-rated shots from the video.

In the video, Nicki wears very revealing clothing and performs some sexual dance moves with her backup dancers. There is also a lot of visual and lyrical innuendo.

The backlash was huge.

People left and right were saying that Nicki's video was not a win for women. Some people were even targeting her with misogynist insults.

You might be thinking:

Maybe she doesn't deserve to get called a slut, but if she's dancing so sexually, she's encouraging — maybe even pressuring — women to do the same, right?

Actually, she's not.

What Nicki Minaj believes is pretty darn empowering for women.

Here is the original interview.

To see that particular segment, skip forward to 4:25 in this video and listen until right up to 5:09.

If you think her words are worth sharing, you know what to do with the little share buttons below. ▼▼

This week, a Supreme Court ruling has acknowledged that, at least for the sake of federal criminal prosecutions, most of the eastern half of Oklahoma belongs to the Muscogee (Creek) Indian Tribe. The ruling enforces treaties made in the 19th century, despite objections from state and federal governments, and upholds the sovereignty of the Muscogee to prosecute crimes committed by tribe members within their own lands.

The U.S. government has a long and storied history of breaking treaties with Native American tribes, and Indigenous communities have suffered greatly because of those broken promises.

Stacy Leeds, a former Cherokee Nation Supreme Court justice and former special district court judge for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, described the ruling in an article on Slate:

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