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She explains why so many women don't say 'Hello.' The reason is absolutely chilling.

After the hidden-camera street harassment video "10 Hours of Walking in NYC as a Woman" went viral, many asked, "Since when does 'hello' qualify as street harassment?" Author and activist Mikki Kendall created the hashtag #NotJustHello to explain how too often "hello" is just the opening line to lewd comments, threats, and even physical violence.

When it comes to street harassment and conversations surrounding #NotJustHello, here are a few of the responses I've seen and would like to put to rest:

"But this is just one woman's story!"

While there are thousands of women from around the world sharing their stories with the #NotJustHello hashtag on Twitter, out of respect I chose to feature Mikki's not only because she started the hashtag but because I had her permission. Unfortunately, the Internet has a tendency to attack women who are brave enough to talk about sexual violence online, and the last thing I want to do is encourage that by sharing anyone's story without their consent.


"Oh, so now I can't say hello to a woman without her thinking I'm a creep?"

No. Saying "hello" does not mean you're a creep or that you're automatically harassing someone. It's also important to remember that cultural norms are different in different places. In small towns, it's not uncommon to say hello to a stranger in passing, but in bigger cities like New York where everyone's on the go, hello from a stranger might seem kinda odd.

Generally speaking, there's nothing wrong with being polite and saying hello to a passing stranger. But it's important to understand that SOME women may not respond because of past experiences with street harassment that followed what appeared to be a polite "hello." Essentially, the creeps have ruined it for the nice guys. It sucks, but this is where we're at.



via Lady A / Twitter and Whittlz / Flickr

In one of the most glaringly hypocritical moves in recent history, the band formerly known as Lady Antebellum is suing black blues singer Anita "Lady A" White, to use her stage name she's performed under for over three decades.

Lady Antebellum announced it had changed its name to Lady A on June 11 as part of its commitment to "examining our individual and collective impact and marking the necessary changes to practice antiracism."

Antebellum refers to an era in the American south before the civil war when black people were held as slaves.

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