See how dancers turned Trump's appalling words into a powerful act of resistance.

With grace, passion, and a rhythm all their own, these dancers are taking the misguided, offensive words of Donald Trump and turning them into something beautiful.

With movements from ballet, jazz, and modern dance, these artists choreographed short routines inspired by statements made by Donald Trump (and one quote from Steve Bannon for good measure).

Photo by Photo by Yohann Ancele, used with permission.


Trump's words, most attributed to him prior to his election, are appalling and cruel.

The video captures the targets of the rhetoric, like African-Americans, women, the LGBTQ community, responding to his hateful vitriol with fiery, passionate choreography.

"Laziness is a trait in blacks."

All GIFs via 836M/Facebook.

"Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything."

"I think that putting a wife to work is a very dangerous thing."

"When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending the best ... they're rapists."

The choreography is a physical act of resistance to the man himself. A bold statement proclaiming, "We remember your words and we will not let you or anyone else define our worth."

Dancers VS Trump quotes

Thanks to our gifted artist in residence Redha Medjellekh for his work, exposing how dance is not only majestic but also a transcending tool of expression.

Posted by 836M on Friday, June 23, 2017

The man behind the project is Redha Medjellekh, a French dancer, choreographer, and videographer.

Medjellekh has made numerous videos that explore social and political topics through dance, and he completed this project as part of his residency at 836M, a gallery and art initiative in San Francisco. For this piece, he worked with a cast of dancers and these shocking quotes to create a powerful statement.

"I like to do contrasts," Medjellekh says. "I thought the Trump quotes with the contrast of the beauty of the dance would play well together."

Medjellekh films part of a scene, photo by Yohann Ancele. Medjellekh photo (right), via Red Is Dancing. Both images used with permission.

With everything happening in the world, it's easy to become discouraged and see little point in speaking out. Do it anyway.

Medjellekh considers performance and self-expression even more necessary in turbulent times like these, especially if it brings underrepresented groups together.

"It's even more important, more relevant in the time of oppression or political disaster or injustice," he says. "It's a good time to make everything creative." That's why Medjellekh makes an effort to incorporate people of different races, religions, gender, and identities, so everyone has a chance to see themselves represented and feel a part of the global conversation.

No matter how you express yourself, your voice is needed now more than ever.

And not just words — your heart, passion, and dance moves too.

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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