See how artists transformed a city bus into a mobile enchanted forest.

Commuting can be soul-crushing: The traffic, the exhaust, the monotony.

But there's a better way.

A few lucky bus riders in Taipei, Taiwan, are swapping the concrete jungle for the real thing thanks to a innovative art installation on a city bus.


Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

Taiwan's "forest bus" offers riders the chance to sit among lilies, orchids, and ferns on moss-covered seats.

Florist Alfie Lin and designer Xiao Qing-Yang converted a 20-seater bus into a mobile solarium designed to resemble an imaginary forest.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

The duo adorned the space with real plants and flowers local to Taipei, making the ride a trip for all of the senses.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

The bus route rolls past some of Taipei's popular attractions and destinations, so tourists and locals alike will have a chance to experience the project. The installation is a way to celebrate green spaces and add some outdoor elements to the travel routines of local commuters.

"The main reason is I think Taiwan should have its own view on nature," Lin told AFP.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

Taipei is no stranger to green space, boasting parks large and small including Yangmingshan, a national park partly within the city limits. But even with beautiful parks and reserves, Taipei is populous and bustling, so getting out to enjoy the great outdoors may be easier said than done. Luckily, the forest bus is making it a little simpler.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

The forest bus is free and running for a limited time, but many riders hope to make it permanent.

The lush commute is a nice change of pace from Taipei's packed city buses and is garnering lots of attention on social media. Because, save for a few allergy sufferers, who wouldn't want to ride among beautiful flowers and plants?

"I feel happy and relaxed on the bus smelling the flowers and plants," passenger Celine Wei told AFP. "I hope it can become a regular service on a double-decker. It would become something special to Taipei."

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

Most Shared
The Guardian / YouTube

Earlier this month, a beluga whale caught the world's attention by playing fetch with a rugby ball thrown by South African researchers off the waters of Norway.

The adorable video has been watched over 20 million times, promoting people across the globe to wonder how the whale became so comfortable around humans.

It's believed that the whale, known as Hvaldimir, was at some point, trained by the Russian military and was either released or escaped.

Keep Reading Show less
Planet
Facebook / Maverick Austin

Your first period is always a weird one. You know it's going to happen eventually, but you're not always expecting it. One day, everything is normal, then BAM. Puberty hits you in a way you can't ignore.

One dad is getting attention for the incredibly supportive way he handled his daughter's first period. "So today I got 'The Call,'" Maverick Austin started out a Facebook post that has now gone viral.

The only thing is, Austin didn't know he got "the call." His 13-year-old thought she pooped her pants. At that age, your body makes no sense whatsoever. It's a miracle every time you even think you know what's going on.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Instagram / Katie Sturino

Plus-size women are in the majority. In America, 68% of women wear a size 14 or higher. Yet many plus-sized are ignored by the fashion industry. Plus-sized clothing is a $21 billion industry, however only one-fifth of clothing sales are plus-sized. On top of that, plus-sized women are often body shamed, further reinforcing that bigger body types are not mainstream despite the fact that it is common.

Plus-size fashion blogger Katie Sturino recently called out her body shamers. Sturino runs the blog, The 12ish Style, showing that plus-sized fashion isn't – and shouldn't be – limited to clothes that hide the body.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
via Twitter / Soraya

There is a strange right-wing logic that suggests when minorities fight for equal rights it's somehow a threat to the rights already held by those in the majority or who hold power.

Like when the Black Lives Matter movement started, many on the right claimed that fighting for black people to be treated equally somehow meant that other people's lives were not as valuable, leading to the short-lived All Lives Matter movement.

This same "oppressed majority" logic is behind the new Straight Pride movement which made headlines in August after its march through the streets of Boston.

Keep Reading Show less
popular