See how artists transformed a city bus into a mobile enchanted forest.

Commuting can be soul-crushing: The traffic, the exhaust, the monotony.

But there's a better way.

A few lucky bus riders in Taipei, Taiwan, are swapping the concrete jungle for the real thing thanks to a innovative art installation on a city bus.


Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

Taiwan's "forest bus" offers riders the chance to sit among lilies, orchids, and ferns on moss-covered seats.

Florist Alfie Lin and designer Xiao Qing-Yang converted a 20-seater bus into a mobile solarium designed to resemble an imaginary forest.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

The duo adorned the space with real plants and flowers local to Taipei, making the ride a trip for all of the senses.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

The bus route rolls past some of Taipei's popular attractions and destinations, so tourists and locals alike will have a chance to experience the project. The installation is a way to celebrate green spaces and add some outdoor elements to the travel routines of local commuters.

"The main reason is I think Taiwan should have its own view on nature," Lin told AFP.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

Taipei is no stranger to green space, boasting parks large and small including Yangmingshan, a national park partly within the city limits. But even with beautiful parks and reserves, Taipei is populous and bustling, so getting out to enjoy the great outdoors may be easier said than done. Luckily, the forest bus is making it a little simpler.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

The forest bus is free and running for a limited time, but many riders hope to make it permanent.

The lush commute is a nice change of pace from Taipei's packed city buses and is garnering lots of attention on social media. Because, save for a few allergy sufferers, who wouldn't want to ride among beautiful flowers and plants?

"I feel happy and relaxed on the bus smelling the flowers and plants," passenger Celine Wei told AFP. "I hope it can become a regular service on a double-decker. It would become something special to Taipei."

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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Canva

As millions of Americans have raced to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, millions of others have held back. Vaccine hesitancy is nothing new, of course, especially with new vaccines, but the information people use to weigh their decisions matters greatly. When choices based on flat-out wrong information can literally kill people, it's vital that we fight disinformation every which way we can.

Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

Keep Reading Show less