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Remember the man who was bullied for dancing a few months ago? He just had the party of a lifetime.

Sean O'Brien finally got his dance party. Take that, anonymous online bullies!

Remember the man who was bullied for dancing a few months ago? He just had the party of a lifetime.

In March 2015, after pictures intended to mock a man named Sean O'Brien went viral, a group of anti-bullying advocates decided to right that wrong.

Pictures of O'Brien made their way around sites Reddit and 4chan in an all-too-common example of anonymous cyberbullying.

What do you do for someone shamed for dancing? You throw him the world's best dance party, obviously.


O'Brien even found himself with some celebrity support.

More than $40,000 was crowdfunded to host the party and fly O'Brien in from the U.K.

All additional funds went to anti-bullying organization The Cybersmile Foundation.

Screenshot from GoFundMe.

On May 24, O'Brien was joined by celebrities, anti-bullying advocates, and supporters in what has to be one of the world's most amazing dance parties.

But that's not all!

While he was in town, O'Brien stopped by "The Today Show," where he danced with Meghan Trainor, and threw out the first pitch at a Dodgers game.

Pretty much on-target there, Sean!

Hopefully this is the start of a much larger trend of standing up for people who are bullied, and for treating each other with a bit more respect.

Sadly, the vast majority of people targeted by bullies online won't get a dance party and a celebrity-filled tour of L.A. in exchange for the trauma they endure. But Sean's story gives me hope. While a dance party might seem small on the larger scale of things, it's always wonderful to see people speaking up to protect those of us in need.

GIFs by AJ+.

Check out AJ+'s recap of Sean O'Brien's epic dance party for a rundown of some of the other celebrities in attendance.

Courtesy of CeraVe
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Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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